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Tempeh Reuben

Tempeh Reuben
Tempeh Reuben
Serves 4
Pickles and all, this is a wonderfully satisfying sandwich! A real winner!
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  1. ¼ cup Apple cider vinegar
  2. ¼ tsp sea salt
  3. ¼ cup rice syrup
  4. 2 Tbsp shoyu
  5. 1 tsp Dijon style mustard
  6. ¼ cup olive oil for marinade plus 1 Tbsp for sautéing onions
  7. 2 lbs tempeh
  8. 3 large onions – cut in thin half moons
  9. 1 tsp caraway seeds
  10. 2 cups sauerkraut – drained
  11. course-grain mustard to taste
  12. extra virgin olive oil to taste - for mustard sauce
  13. rice syrup to taste
  14. dill pickles
  15. whole grain sourdough sliced bread
  1. Combine and whisk marinade ingredients in a bowl: vinegar, salt, rice syrup, shoyu, Dijon mustard, olive oil
  2. Cut the tempeh in bread-size pieces and again in half-widths.
  3. Pour marinade over tempeh and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes.
  4. Bake tempeh in pre-heated oven at 350F for about 30 minutes, turning 1-2 times during the cooking.
  5. Sauté the onions with olive oil until sweet and translucent.
  6. Add the caraway seeds and sauerkraut and a little water.
  7. Cover and simmer on medium low heat for about an hour.
  8. Remove the lid and cook away any excess liquid.
  9. Prepare the mustard sauce: whisk good quality course-grain mustard with a little extra virgin olive oil and rice syrup to taste
  10. Slice dill pickles so that they will lay flat on sandwiches
  11. Steam sliced sourdough bread until heated through
  1. For a tasty delight, layer your sandwich as follows: bread followed by sliced pickles followed by tempeh then sautéed onions & kraut and drizzled with mustard sauce.
Kushi Institute

Berry Cobbler

Berry Cobbler
Berry Cobbler
A great way to enjoy melon when the weather is turning cold and cold raw fruit is no longer appealing.
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  1. 1 cantaloupe melon – cut in medium small cubes
  2. 1 cup of fresh or frozen organic berries – I chose raspberries and cherries
  3. 1 cup apple or other sugar free juice
  4. Pinch sea salt
  5. 1 tsp vanilla extract
  6. 1 Tbsp kuzu root starch – diluted in ¼ cup cold juice
  7. Ingredients – topping
  8. ½ cup rolled oats – ground in food processor
  9. ½ cup whole wheat pastry flour or unbleached white
  10. ½ cup almonds – ground in food processor
  11. ½ cup pecans – ground in food processor
  12. ¼ cup neutral oil
  13. ½ - ¾ cup rice syrup
  14. Pinch sea salt
  15. 1 tsp non-aluminum baking powder
  1. 1 cup whole raw almonds – blanched and skins removed
  2. About 2 cups water
  3. 1 tsp vanilla extract
  4. Pinch sea salt
  5. Rice syrup to taste
  1. 1. Simmer the melon with the juice and sea salt for about 15 minutes
  2. 2. Stir in the diluted kuzu and vanilla
  3. 3. Take off the stove and add the berries
  4. 4. Combine all topping ingredients and with a rubber spatula.
  5. 5. Pour fruit mixture into a baking dish and cover with the topping. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 375F for about 25 minutes or until topping is lightly browned and the juices from the fruits starts bubbling through.
  6. 6. In a good blender (preferably a Vitamix), blend almonds with enough water to achieve a smooth consistency. Don’t worry if it seems watery - when you cook it, the almond cream will thicken up.
  7. 7. Once the almond cream is smooth, bring to a simmer over medium heat in a thick bottomed sauce pan. Careful not to burn.
  8. 8. Add the salt and vanilla simmer for about 10 minutes.
  9. 9. Remove from heat and sweeten with rice syrup according to your taste.
  10. Serve cobbler warm or at room temperature with almond cream…. Enjoy!
  1. Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone’s Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success.
  2. *
Kushi Institute

Kimchi Pressed Salad / Kimchi Pickle

Kimchi Pressed Salad / Kimchi Pickle
Kimchi Pressed Salad / Kimchi Pickle
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *
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  1. • 1 medium size head Chinese cabbage (2lbs) – remove any wilted out leaves, rinse and then cut the cabbage in half from top to bottom, remove the core and slice both halves of the cabbage ½ inch thick pieces
  2. • 1 medium size ½ lb daikon – cut in matchsticks
  3. • 1-2 ribs celery – cut in half lengthwise and slice in thin diagonals
  4. • 1-2 carrots – cut in fine matchsticks
  5. • 1/3 cup scallions – cut in half lengthwise and then in 1 inch pieces
  6. • 1 tsp ginger – peeled and finely grated
  7. • 1- 2 tsp garlic – peeled and finely grated (Optional)
  8. • ¼ cup course or fine sea salt
  9. • 1 tsp – 1 Tbsp Korean chili flakes
  10. • 2 tsp rice syrup
  11. • Few turns fresh black pepper
  1. • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  2. • 2 tsp rice syrup
  3. • 1 tsp shoyu
  1. 1. Combine all the vegetables
  2. 2. Add the seasonings and work well into vegetables
  3. 3. Taste and adjust seasoning, the mixture should taste lightly salty and have a good flavor
  4. 4. Place in a salad press or use a plate and a weight press your salad
  5. 5. Leave for 1-2 hours, take out desired amount, gently squeeze, whisk dressing ingredients and serve with dressing or as is, enjoy!
  1. If you continue to press the kimchi make sure when you check it that your hands are clean and dry.
  2. A porcelain ginger grater works great, if you don’t have one peel the ginger and cut in thin slices, then into fine match sticks and then finely mince.
  3. When you are ready to eat your salad or kimchi pickle if it is too salty rinse briefly in a strainer and squeeze out excess water.
  4. Korean chili powder can be purchased in an Asian Market, it is an essential ingredient in Korean cuisine, gochugaru (or kochukaru) is a coarsely ground red pepper with a texture between flakes and powder. Traditionally, gochugaru is made from sun-dried chile peppers, and versions that are prepared in this manner are still considered the best tasting. The flavor is hot, sweet, and slightly smoky. You can use chili flakes or cayenne powder but the taste just isn’t the same!
  5. If you don’t have a salad press and you are pressing your salad in a bowl with a plate and a weight on top then be sure to cover with a clean kitchen towel.
  1. The leftover salad can be eaten as is or turned into a kimchi pickle, simply continue to press the salad on your counter top for 1-5 days, taste daily and when you want the fermentation process to stop simply refrigerate
Kushi Institute

Sesame Amazake Blueberry Tart

Sesame Amazake Blueberry Tart
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *
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  1. • ½ cup white sesame seeds – washed and dry toasted in a skillet, set aside
  2. • ½ cup rolled outs – lightly ground in food processor
  3. • Pinch sea salt
  4. • 1-2 Tbsp untoasted sesame oil
  5. • 2-3 Tbsp rice syrup
  6. • 1 tsp zest of organic orange
  1. • 2 cups amazake
  2. • 1 heaping Tbsp agar flakes
  3. • 2 tsp kuzu root starch – diluted in ¼ cup cold water
  4. • 1 tsp zest of organic lemon
  5. • Pinch sea salt
  1. • 2 cup apple juice
  2. • 3 Tbsp agar
  3. • 2 cups fresh or frozen organic blueberries
  4. • 2 tsp kuzu root starch diluted in ¼ cup apple juice
  5. • Pinch of sea salt
  6. • 1 tsp lemon juice
  7. • 1-2 Tbsp rice syrup
  1. 1. Pre-heat oven to 350F
  2. 2. Combine BASE ingredients, cut a circle of baking paper to fit the bottom of your 8 or 9 inch spring form cake pan
  3. 3. Press the mixture evenly over the bottom of the cake pan
  4. 4. Bake for 15-20 minutes, remove from oven and allow to cool
  5. 5. In a thick bottomed sauce pan heat the amazake with the agar and sea salt, turn down to simmer and simmer gently until agar is completely dissolved
  6. 6. Whisk the amazake while you stir in the diluted kudzu
  7. 7. Stir in the lemon zest, simmer another minute and set aside
  8. 8. In a thick bottomed sauce pan heat the 2 cups apple juice with the agar and sea salt
  9. 9. Allow to simmer until the agar has completely dissolved
  10. 10. Whisk the juice while you stir in the diluted kudzu
  11. 11. Add the blueberries and lemon juice and sweeten with rice syrup to taste
  12. 12. Once the sesame layer of your tart is cooled pour in the amazake and spread evenly, refrigerate until cool and firm.
  13. 13. Once the amazake layer is firm, layer with the blueberry juice mixture, refrigerate until you are ready to serve.
  14. Tip: the sesame layer is a little sticky, so it is better to remove the tart completely from the spring form pan to a cutting board where you can cut it properly and remove it from the baking paper.
Kushi Institute

Understanding Diabetes by Edward Esko

According to estimates, diabetes is positioned to become the leading public health epidemic of the 21st century. Worldwide, the incidence of diabetes has increased dramatically. Diabetes is expected to affect 350 million people by 2030, doubling from the 2000 level of 170 million. The greatest increase is expected to occur in the developing countries of Asia, Africa, and the Persian Gulf.

In the United States, the number of people with diabetes jumped from 5.6 million in 1980 to 20.9 million in 2010. Close to 27% of persons over age 65 now have diabetes. One in three Americans are predicted to develop diabetes by mid-century. The cost of treating diabetes in the U.S. will soon approach $200 billion per year. Diabetes threatens to overwhelm health care systems in this country and around the world. Diabetes is a major factor in the ongoing financial crisis caused by skyrocketing health care costs.

Modern medicine remains powerless in the face of this planet-wide surge. In a special 200th anniversary article in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM 2012; 367-1332/October 4, 2012) entitled “The Past 200 Years in Diabetes,” Dr. Kenneth Polonsky states: “…The pathway to cure has remained elusive. In fact, if one views diabetes from a public health and overall societal standpoint, little progress has been made toward conquering the disease during the past 200 years, and we are arguably worse off now than we were in 1812.”

Could it be that after billions in research and decades of effort, we are worse off now than we were two centuries years ago? Perhaps it is time to take stock and reassess. Perhaps a fresh approach is called for. Let us now examine diabetes from the macrobiotic perspective, beginning with the role of the pancreas.

The Role of the Pancreas
The pancreas is a flat shaped organ located on the left side of the body below the stomach. In its structure, function, and energy it is complementary to the liver, the large organ located opposite it on the right side. The pancreas, being lower in position and more flat than the liver, is classified as yang. The liver, being larger and more expanded, is comparatively yin. (Yang is the term used to describe smaller or more compact forms; yin is the term used to describe larger, more expanded forms.)

The pancreas is animated primarily by celestial force flowing down toward earth. This more yang force is stronger on the left side of the body. The descending colon is evidence of its influence. The liver, on the other hand, receives stronger upward energy. This more yin force originates with the rotation of the earth and is stronger on the right side of the body. Hence the ascending colon is located on the right. The primary forces of yin and yang create the organs and animate their respective functions.

This classification is essential and relevant to our understanding of the cause of diabetes as well as to the prevention and recovery from this disease.

Looking at the way in which these organs interact to regulate the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood will help illustrate this further. The metabolic sugar cycle is divided into stages:

1. Eating food
2. Digesting, or breaking carbohydrate down into glucose (simple sugar)
3. Glucose entering the blood
4. Pancreas releasing insulin
5. Glucose exiting blood and entering body cells.

The processes of eating, digestion, and the absorption of glucose by the bloodstream represent the yin or expansive phase of the cycle. Chewing and digestion are processes of breakdown and decomposition, in this case, breaking down more complex carbohydrates into simple sugar known as glucose. The release of insulin by the pancreas and the entrance of glucose into the cells are the yang or contractive phases in the cycle. The net result of the yin phase is a rise in blood glucose (sugar), while the result of the yang phase is a decrease in blood glucose. High blood sugar is yin, while low blood sugar is yang.

The pancreas performs a dual function. The acini cells secrete digestive enzymes, similar to saliva. On the whole, pancreatic digestive juice is alkaline and yang. It especially aids in the digestion of fats, which are yin. Scattered throughout the pancreas are about a million cell clusters known as the “islets of Langerhans.” The islets are a compact collection of endocrine cells that secrete the hormones that regulate the conversion of sugar into energy and hence the level of sugar in the blood.

The two primary endocrine cells are known as alpha cells and beta cells. The smaller and denser beta cells secrete the yang hormone insulin, which lowers blood sugar. Alpha cells, which are larger and more expanded, secrete the yin hormone glucagon, which has the effect of raising the level of sugar in the blood. As we saw above, on the whole the pancreas is a yang organ. The pancreas contains far more beta cells than alpha cells. The ratio of beta cells to alpha cells is approximately 85% to 15%, or about seven parts beta to one part alpha.

Insulin and Glucagon
Insulin and glucagon offer a perfect example of complementary balance. When blood sugar becomes elevated, the beta cells secrete insulin. Insulin causes glucose to enter the body’s cells, thus lowering the blood sugar level. It also signals the liver to bind glucose molecules for storage in the form of glycogen. The net result is a decrease in blood glucose.

Conversely, when the glucose level becomes low, the alpha cells secrete glucagon. This yin hormone signals the liver to break stored glycogen (yang) down into free glucose (yin), thus raising blood sugar levels.
Insulin (yang) bonds with receptors on the cell membrane (yin).

The mechanism by which insulin facilitates the entry of glucose into the body’s cells can also be understood in terms of yin and yang. Cells consist of an outer cell membrane (yin) and an inner cell nucleus (yang.) Free glucose circulating in the blood is yin, while insulin, as we saw, is yang. Glucose is naturally repelled by the yin cell membrane; it needs a yang agent to facilitate transfer through the membrane and into the interior of the cell. This is accomplished by insulin. Insulin readily bonds with receptors on the cell membrane and passes through the membrane into the interior. The presence of insulin below the surface membrane changes the quality of the membrane. It now becomes yang and attracts and admits glucose.

What is Diabetes?
Diabetes occurs when the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin or when the body’s cells resist or reject the insulin that is produced. The result is high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, which produces a number of symptoms and side effects, both immediate and long term. In his article Dr. Polonsky describes the disease as follows:

“Over the past two centuries, we have learned that diabetes is a complex, heterogeneous disorder. Type 1 diabetes occurs predominantly in young people and is due to selective autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cell, leading to insulin deficiency. Type 2 diabetes is much more common, and the vast majority of people with this disorder are overweight. The increase in body weight in the general population, a result of high-fat, high-calorie diets and a sedentary lifestyle, is the most important factor associated with the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Older adults are most likely to have type 2 diabetes, although the age at onset has been falling in recent years. Type 2 diabetes is now common among teenagers and young adults.

“We now know that insulin resistance is essential in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and that the disease results from both insulin resistance and impaired beta cell function.”

Both insulin resistance and impaired beta cell function are yin conditions, as are obesity and overweight. A primary cause of these conditions is the intake of strongly yin simple sugars, such as refined sugar, as well as refined carbohydrates like white rice and white flour. The continual intake of these extremes exhausts and depletes the beta cells. The result is either not enough insulin or insulin that is too weak to facilitate the transfer of glucose across the cell membrane. If insulin lacks strong yang power, it will not be able to bond with the cell membrane and enter the interior of the cell. Without insulin as a facilitator, glucose does not enter the cell but remains circulating in the blood, hence the high level of blood glucose characteristic of diabetes. This mechanism explains the onset of type 2 diabetes.

The mechanism of type 1 diabetes is a little different, albeit also extremely yin. T. Colin Campbell, PhD in The China Study, best describes the process:

“This devastating, incurable disease strikes children, creating a painful and difficult experience for young families. What most people don’t know, though, is that there is strong evidence that this disease is linked to diet and, more specifically to dairy products. The ability of cow’s milk protein to initiate type 1 diabetes is well documented.”

As Dr. Campbell explains, in some infants, cow milk proteins are not fully digested and small amino acid chains or protein fragments are absorbed by the small intestine. In the bloodstream the immune system identifies these fragments as antigens, or foreign proteins, and codes antibodies to destroy them. Some of these protein fragments are identical in form to insulin-producing beta cells. Antibodies produced by the immune system thus destroy both the cow proteins and the beta cells, taking away the child’s ability to produce insulin. The result is type 1 diabetes, an incurable lifetime condition.

Once again, we can understand this process in terms of yin and yang. Milk, a product of the yang animal body, is a powerfully yin secretion designed for growth. This is especially true for the milk of large mammals such as a cows. The intake of this strongly yin substance (often together with refined sugar) is largely responsible for the onset of type 1 diabetes.

Good Carbs vs. Bad Carbs
Carbohydrates come in two types: “simple” or “complex.” Simple carbohydrates contain just one sugar molecule (monosaccharide) or two sugar molecules (disaccharide.) Simple sugars demonstrate strong expansive force. These yin molecules enter the bloodstream very quickly. They cause a rapid spike in blood sugar. In contrast, complex carbohydrates consist of a chain of sugar molecules linked together. Their strong bonding force is yang. The body has to work harder to break down the links in the chain; hence they enter the bloodstream more slowly than simple sugars. The level of sugar in the blood remains more constant and steady. This distinction is crucial in understanding the effect of diet on diabetes.

Examples of simple carbohydrates include table sugar, honey, fruit, fruit juice, jam, and chocolate. They are often labeled “bad” because they are high in calories compared to their nutritional content and because of their effect on blood sugar. Complex carbohydrates are lower in net calories and are sometimes touted as “healthy carbs.” They include foods like whole grains, beans, whole grain bread and pasta, vegetables, especially sweet-tasting ones, and sea vegetables.

Brown vs. White Rice
Brown rice contains beneficial fiber, minerals, vitamins, and phytochemicals like beta-carotene. Milling and polishing brown rice removes most of its vitamins and minerals. It also strips away most of the fiber in brown rice. The fiber in brown rice and other whole grains slows the absorption of glucose and helps prevent diabetes. That is because the carbohydrate in whole grain fibers is yang and cohesive. The body has to work harder to break the links that bind the carbohydrate chains together.

Although the starch in white rice, white flour, and a baked potato is in the form of complex carbohydrate, the body converts this starch into blood sugar almost as quickly as it processes pure glucose. These foods cause a rapid rise in blood sugar and are classified as having a high glycemic index. The glycemic index classifies foods on how quickly and how high they raise the level of sugar in the blood in comparison to pure glucose.

As we have seen, a food like brown rice is digested more slowly. It doesn’t cause a rapid spike in blood sugar and is classified as having a low glycemic index. When brown rice is milled and refined by removing its bran and germ, its glycemic index rises. The same is true of whole wheat and other grains. Finely ground grain (yin or expansive) is more rapidly digested than coarsely ground grain (more contractive or yang), and has a higher glycemic index. The type of starch is also a factor in determining a food’s glycemic index. More yin starches, like those in potatoes, are rapidly digested and absorbed. Potatoes have a high glycemic index. More yang starches, like those in brown rice, are processed more slowly and have a low glycemic index.

Because of these factors, brown rice is being touted as a possible solution to the diabetes epidemic, especially in China and other rapidly developing countries. A January 2012 article from the Harvard School of Public Health entitled, “Can Brown Rice Slow the Spread of Type 2 Diabetes?” states:

“The worldwide spike in type 2 diabetes in recent decades has paralleled a shift in diets away from staple foods rich in whole grains to highly refined carbohydrates, such as white rice and refined flours. Now a group of researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) aims to stem the tide by changing the color of the world’s rice bowl from white to more-nutritious brown.”

The announcement of a collaborative initiative to prevent the global diabetes epidemic by improving the quality of carbohydrate consumed follows an earlier study published on June 14, 2010 on the website of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine. In the study, HSPH researchers found that eating five or more servings of white rice per week was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, while a diet that includes two or more servings of brown rice was associated with a lower risk. The investigators estimated that the risk of type 2 diabetes could be lowered by 16% by replacing 50 grams of white rice (1/3rd of a typical daily serving) with the same amount of brown rice. Interestingly, replacing the same amount of white rice with whole wheat or barley was associated with a 36% lower risk.

“From a public health point of view, whole grains, rather than refined carbohydrates, such as white rice should be recommended as the primary source of carbohydrates for the U.S. population,” said senior researcher Frank Hu. “These findings could have even greater implications for Asian and other populations in which rice is a staple food.”

The Potential of Macrobiotics
Macrobiotic educators have for decades advocated an approach similar to the approach advocated by the Harvard School of Public Health. The macrobiotic diet may offer the most effective approach to the prevention of diabetes. Macrobiotics advocates avoiding milk and dairy products associated with type 1 diabetes. Human breast-milk is preferred for infants. Refined sugar and artificial sweeteners like high fructose corn syrup are not recommended. Macrobiotics recommends avoiding or reducing foods such as potatoes, white flour, white rice, and others with a high glycemic index. Instead, foods rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber like whole grains, beans, fresh vegetables, and sea vegetables are the foundation of the macrobiotic diet. These foods are associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Moreover, the macrobiotic diet may prove an effective tool in the management of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, successful management and recovery have been noted in persons adopting a macrobiotic way of eating. Persons with type 2 diabetes have experienced a marked reduction in the need for medication; some after only one or two weeks after beginning the diet. Some patients have eliminated the need for medication entirely while noting marked improvements in overall health. At the very least, macrobiotics is acknowledged as an effective tool in weight loss and weight management. Patients with type 1 diabetes have noted reductions in the need for insulin and a lessening of complications after adopting a plant-based macrobiotic way of eating. Macrobiotics can help these patients better manage their condition.

With the mounting evidence linking diet with the cause, prevention, management, and potential recovery from diabetes, the time has come for clinical trials of the macrobiotic approach. Macrobiotics could very well offer a solution to this 21st century epidemic.

The article is from Rice Field Essays by Edward Esko, Amberwaves Press, 2014.


Bettina’s Blueberry Tart

Blueberry Tart with Cashew Cream
Serves 6
Bettina Zumdick, Kushi Institute teacher and counselor, has been involved in Macrobiotics for over twenty-five years. A native of the Baltic Sea area in Germany, she studied food science at the University of Muenster. Bettina has taught Macrobiotics and other mind-body-spirit related topics such as meditation, Tao Yin Yoga and chanting throughout Europe and the United States. Enjoy this refreshing dessert courtesy of Bettina. Learn more about Bettina at
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  1. 1 ¾ cup whole wheat pastry flour
  2. 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
  3. ¼ cup sunflower seed oil
  4. ½ cup maple syrup
  5. ½ teaspoon baking soda
  6. ½ teaspoon almond extract
  7. ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  1. 2 cups organic apple juice
  2. pinch of salt
  3. 1 tablespoon agar flakes
  4. 1 tablespoon kuzu, diluted in 2 tablespoons of water
  5. ¼ cup rice syrup or maple syrup
  6. ½ pint fresh blueberries (or other seasonal berries like strawberries, raspberries or pitted cherries)
  7. fresh mint leaves for garnish
For the Crust
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Farenheit.
  2. Lightly oil a tart pan or line with parchment paper.
  3. In separate bowls, mix dry ingredients and wet ingredients. Next, gently whisk the wet ingredients into the dry mixture until the dough forms a ball. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough out to approximately 1/8 inch thickness. Transfer the dough into the tart pan, cutting off excess dough around the edges. Bake for 5 to 12 minutes or until the dough is golden brown. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool.
For the Filling
  1. Place apple juice, salt, agar flakes and rice syrup in a saucepan. Turn on heat and bring to a boil. Stir occasionally and boil until agar flakes are dissolved. Add diluted kuzu, stirring constantly to prevent lumping. Simmer until thickened. Stir in blueberries. Remove from heat and pour over pre-baked crust. Refrigerate to set filling. Garnish with mint leaves.
Find more dessert recipes in Bettina's book
  1. 10 Delicious Desserts for All Occasions
Adapted from 10 Delicious Desserts for All Occasions
Kushi Institute

María José Colás Martínez Testimonial

IMG-20150407-WA0008Macrobiotic Leadership Program: Level I-IV Student Testimonial

María José Colás Martínez, April to July 2015

I first heard about Macrobiotics through my aunt. My aunt started to go to a Macrobiotic doctor in Spain. He studied macrobiotics with George Ohsawa (founder of Macrobiotics) and western medicine. He helped my aunt to stay in shape and have a successful pregnancy. She maintained her weight and had a lovely child.

In University, I studied chemical engineering. I started working in this field but always remembered the natural path that my aunt introduced me to. I worked for a cosmetics company, petrochemical company and also trading import and export from China and Spain. My job gave me the opportunity to live in China for two years. While in China, I became sick and couldn’t breathe very well. I went to see a Traditional Chinese Medicine doctor. This experience gave me great insight to more of what natural healing can do. After one week I was feeling perfectly fine.

Later on back in Spain, I was walking to my office one day and I felt that this was not theIMAG0260 right job for me and realized I needed to change my life. I wasn’t happy and knew I should be. I always wanted to do something related with the natural health field, so I decided to open an organic shop. My shop, Purusha, has been running for almost a year now. While working with my customers I realized I had a lack of knowledge around food and nutrition. I made an appointment with the doctor that had treated my aunt a long time ago. I wanted to learn for myself more about his Macrobiotic education. In the short time of meeting with him, he amazed and inspired me. He made me think that this is what I want to do with my life. Right away I started doing a bit of research and I found out the Kushi Institute (KI) in Becket, MA is where to get first hand information on macrobiotics. I set my goal to go study at the KI. My plan is to help people to live a better and more complete life through diet and lifestyle by following Macrobiotic principles. Amazing! Here I am studying at the KI and will complete the Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Levels I through III, and two weeks of the Level IV program. I hope to become the best counselor, chef and teacher that I can possibly be when I get back to Valencia, Spain.




Tribute to Shizuko Yamamoto

By Patricio Garcia de Paredes


I met Shizuko Yamamoto in the late 1970s in Spain. She had come to Barcelona to teach macrobiotics and shiatsu. My mother, Luisa Baranda, was one of the persons who organized her trip and she stayed at my house. In those days in Spain we still had not much contact with oriental culture and with people from Asia. So for her to stay in my house was both exiting and intriguing. Although I was just a kid at the time, her presence made a strong impression on me that I can still remember to this day. She was kind and considerate, yet strong and sharp. And in my view she embodied many of the qualities that I had created in my mind about what a person of wisdom and deep understanding of life from the far-east would be like. At the same time Shizuko was a very practical person and her unique down-to-earth style of teaching was very well received. She influenced many people’s lives and now in Spain and throughout Europe shiatsu has become very popular thanks to her pioneering work.

Among the most inspiring aspects about Shizuko was her own life story. She was a living example of how we can transform difficulties into possibilities and change suffering into happiness. Following World War II in Japan food was scarce and malnutrition widespread. To remedy the situation, the Allied occupation forces introduced milk and meat along with modern nutritional ideas about the importance of animal protein and calcium to develop strong, healthy bodies. It was believed at the time that the small size of the Japanese people was due to the nutritional inadequacy of the traditional Japanese diet, particularly lack of meat, milk and dairy products. Parents were encouraged to feed their children as much meat and milk as possible so that they would grow more big and strong. So while growing up Shizuko became an avid meat eater and she was even awarded as The Best Grown Child in her elementary school. However, that way of eating weakened her health and at the age of 21 she was diagnosed with leukemia. She also had vision and eye problems and went through 10 operations to correct her eyesight. She spent 3 years in and out of hospitals. After the hospital trauma, she stayed at home, almost hiding out from social activities for more than eight years. At one point she became determined to change her life and regain her health, so she began to look for alternatives.

While living with her parents in Tokyo, Shizuko was introduced to shiatsu (Japanese style of finger-pressure massage). There was an older woman, a shiatsu practitioner, who came to her home to give her parents shiatsu treatments. Originally she was not attracted to shiatsu and rejected the idea of other oriental healing arts. In those days in Japan people were educated to follow the western ways and shiatsu was looked upon as something backwards and unscientific. As a result many of the traditional cultural and healing arts were banned and just a few licensed practitioners were permitted to treat with shiatsu and only when they practiced within private homes. However, besides her eye problems, she also experienced pain on her neck and stiff shoulders, so she decided to receive shiatsu. And because it felt good and relived her pain, she began to study and practice various oriental ways of developing health and achieving well-being.

The first step began by reading a book on yoga and attending yoga classes which triggered other changes in her way of life. She also learned about macrobiotics and began to make dietary changes by centering her way of eating on brown rice, local vegetables, beans and bean products, sea vegetables and other plant foods and stopped eating meat and sugar. Every day she exercised a lot, went for walks and began to meditate. She would open the windows, let fresh air in and practice breathing exercises. Practically her whole life went through a whole transformation and within one month she already began feeling much better.

As time passed and her health recovered she felt drawn to begin helping other people. This sympathetic feeling towards helping others has been the foundation and driving force of what eventually would become her dream and life work. She first began to teach yoga and other corrective exercises at a training center. As she worked with people she realized that although the problems differed and the symptoms appeared to be different, they all shared the same origin. For example everyone followed unbalanced ways of eating and did not know how to move or breathe correctly. So everyone would get better by improving dietary habits and correcting breathing and movement exercises. This proved to her that if you make dietary changes and lifestyle adjustments you can get good results to strengthen and possibly recover health. For those students that would need extra help, she would she would give them shiatsu. She also started to try new techniques and began to use not just her hands and fingers to apply pressure but also her feet which later developed and evolved into a new style of barefoot shiatsu. In addition she also found out that yoga was very useful combined with shiatsu.

While helping people, she continued to study and integrate other natural and traditional healing and self-development arts including seitai (a system of guided self-corrective exercises), reiki (a form of palm healing), acupuncture, and aikido, many of which had been driven underground. Through her own experience and by integrating many different techniques and approaches, eventually she began to develop her own, original way of helping people. This included a well-balanced macrobiotic way of eating coupled with corrective exercises and shiatsu, which were to become the three main pillars of her unique approach to help individuals regain better health and alleviate their suffering. She then went on to develop a holistic beauty school where people could learn about macrobiotics, cooking, yoga and other corrective exercises, receive shiatsu and develop natural physical and mental beauty from within.

George and Lima Ohsawa

George and Lima Ohsawa

During those years, Shizuko had been studying macrobiotics with George and Lima Ohsawa, the founders and main proponents of modern macrobiotics. In 1965, after returning from a trip around the world, George Ohsawa called Shizuko and suggested to her to go to the United States to help spread macrobiotics in the west. At the beginning she hesitated because she had just started her holistic beauty school. But George continued to encourage her and after some consideration, she decided to take the challenge. She began to work on her visa with the help of Michio Kushi who was her sponsor in the United States and selling all her clothes and everything she owned to raise money. While Shizuko was making preparations of what would be an epic journey, in a curious twist of fate both her mother and her mentor George Ohsawa passed away. At Ohsawa’s funeral his friend Morihei Ueshiba, the creator of aikido as its known today, encouraged her in her journey to the West.


Morihei Ueshiba

Arriving in America in 1966, Shizuko went to work initially as a private macrobiotic cook and guide to Hollywood movie star Gloria Swanson and her husband-to-be William Duffy. Swanson was the first actress to utilize her fame to campaign against crop spraying back in the 1920s. Both Swanson and Duffy were very influential promoting dietary changes in a more natural, healthy macrobiotic orientation. Duffy wrote Sugar Blues and Lady Sings the Blues, two controversial books that contributed to raise awareness about the harmfulness of sugar. Later she worked in a macrobiotic restaurant. While working at the restaurant some employees would complain about stiff neck and shoulders and she would work on them for a few minutes. Eventually by word of the mouth she began to make a living from giving shiatsu.

 eu a aprender com Shizuko Yamamoto 1986 Kiental Sui--at_shizuko_6_329Little by little Shizuko was invited to give talks on Eastern traditional healing methods and demonstrate techniques. She also met with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, who came to learn for years to learn about macrobiotics and also to receive treatments. Yoko and John introduced Shizuko to many influential people in New York, including John Cage, the dancer Merce Cunningham, actors Irma Paule and Mary Steenburg, Ted Danson and many senators. With a little help from her friends and clients along with some donations, she was able to establish the Macrobiotic Center of New York on a shoestring and was the president from 1970 to 1990. She would work seven days a week teaching, counseling and sometimes treating ten people a day. Since many Americans had large bodies with stiff muscles due to eating more meat and animal food, she began to use more her feet and elbows in addition to her hands. She would also teach at Michio and Aveline Kushi’s house in Boston and later at the Kushi Institute to many students.


(L to R) Shizuko Yamamoto, Aveline Kushi, Michio Kushi, William Duffy and Cecile Levin

Shizuko Yamamoto gave seminars and workshops throughout the United States, Europe, Cuba, and her native Japan. Her influential work has inspired countless individuals around the world. And she has personally counseled, treated and guided thousands of individuals towards better health and happiness, including many celebrities and influential people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock. She is recognized as one of the pioneer shiatsu teachers in the West and leading shiatsu practitioners in the world. She was the creator of Barefoot Shiatsu and Macrobiotic Shiatsu styles. To further world-wide communication in the natural healing field, she initiated the International Macrobiotic Shiatsu Society. She has authored several books including Barefoot Shiatsu, The Shiatsu Handbook, 20-Minute Shiatsu, and Whole Health Shiatsu. Her books have been translated into seven languages. In Shizuko’s words she concludes simply by saying that: “The essence of shiatsu is love, which is infinitely available.”








She was also an accomplished macrobiotic cooking instructor and has lectured and written widely on the importance of a natural, balanced way of eating for personal as well as for family health. Commenting on macrobiotics, she mentioned that “As long as you are determined to change your life, the practice of macrobiotics itself is easy and fun.”

Shizuko Yamamoto taught that to fundamentally change for the better we must learn from nature and develop a way of life in harmony with nature. She often would say that “We are one with nature,” based on the oriental concept of “shin-do-fuji.” Throughout her life she promoted organic foods and sustainable farming. She also realized through her own experience that in order to create a better world we need to begin by changing ourselves from within. By improving our health and looking at life in a positive way. This then would influence our family and reverberate in society. Now shiatsu and macrobiotics continues to grow and is sought after by many people around the world. Shizuko continued to teach, guide people and spread her message until late in her eighties even after losing most of her vision. She will be remembered by many as an outstanding teacher and a compassionate person who tirelessly dedicated her life toward helping other fellow human beings. May her life work be a source of inspiration to us all and her dream continue to influence humanity for many generations to come.


 0089Patricio Garcia de Paredes

Patricio was introduced to macrobiotics at the age of five by his mother, Luisa Baranda, in his native Spain. After completing studies at the Kushi Institute, he began to give cooking classes and teach in Southeast Asia, South America, and Spain. In 1998 he moved to Japan and was executive chef at Kushi Garden and Chaya Macrobiotic Restaurant. Besides developing macrobiotic restaurants, he also maintained educational activities including giving cooking classes, presenting lectures, and publishing macrobiotic cookbooks. Presently he is the Education Director at the Kushi Institute of Japan. He currently resides in Japan with his wife, four daughters and one son.




Christina Pirello’s Italian Nut Cookies

FullSizeRenderWe were so thrilled to have Christina and Robert Pirello join us at the Kushi Institute this Spring. Christina was a wonderful faculty addition to our Macrobiotic Leadership Program (we are looking forward to having her as guest faculty for a few days in September for Level 1). She also kicked off our 1st Saturday Seasonal Cooking with some very delicious recipes!


Christina Pirello’s Italian Nut Cookies with Chocolate Glaze
Makes about 24 cookies

2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
½ cup semolina flour
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch sea salt
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 stick Earth Balance baking sticks
½ cup brown rice syrup
3 tablespoons coconut sugar granules
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
½ cup coarsely chopped pecans
¼ cup coarsely chopped walnuts

chocolate glaze
¼ cup unsweetened almond or oat milk
3 tablespoons brown rice syrup
1 cup non-dairy, dark chocolate

Preheat oven to 350o and line a baking sheet with parchment.
Whisk together flour, semolina, cinnamon, salt, cocoa powder and baking powder and soda. Whip Earth Balance, syrup, coconut sugar and vanilla. Fold into flour mixture to form a soft, formable dough. Fold in nuts. Using moist hands, form dough into 1-inch spheres and arrange on baking sheet.

Bake until cookies are just firm, but still slightly soft, 18-20 minutes. Allow to cool for 2-3 minutes on baking sheet. Transfer to a wire rack and cool completely.

Make the glaze by placing almond milk and rice syrup in a small saucepan and bringing to a high boil. Pour over chocolate and whisk to form a smooth, satin-like glaze.

Slip a piece of parchment paper under the rack of cookies. Spoon glaze over each one, letting the glaze run over the sides. Allow to stand, undisturbed, until glaze begins to set. Transfer to a serving platter.  

Cook’s Tip: These cookies will keep, in a sealed container for several days.


Yesenia Saad’s Fibromyalgia Recovery

photoI was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2011. I was struggling, feeling very fatigued. I had insomnia for many months and then became depressed. My body was sore 24/7 and I usually woke up tired, experiencing a lot of headaches and anxiety during the night.  Many people told me to start working out, but I already had a very active lifestyle. I went through 4 different anti-depressant treatments. I also took Xanax and Lyrica for the pain, but it didn’t help me. Experiencing Fibromyalgia caused me to stay in bed for about 4 to 6 months. This affected all of my relationships. At one point, I felt that cancer would be better than Fibromyalgia.
Two years after being on this medicine, I talked with one of my best friends, Salvatore Luccherino. At the time he had a Macrobiotic B&B in Portugal and currently is selling organic tempeh ( Salvatore started talking to me about how the Macrobiotic diet could help with Fibromyalgia. I felt so inspired after talking with him that I booked a ticket to Portugal to learn from him in person. I stayed with Salvatore for 2 weeks while he cooked for me and showed me how to start eating a Macrobiotic diet.
While I was in Portugal, I had a macrobiotic consultation with Francisco Varatojo who owns a Macrobiotic center in Portugal, ( Francisco saw that my consumption of animal products was very high and recommended that I adjust my diet. After only 2 weeks of eating a macrobiotic diet, my body started to react in a positive way. My energy returned. I finally started smiling again and felt like I was my healthy self again. I was happy, living without pain and sleeping perfectly. After 4 months, I stopped taking all of my medicine for Fibromyalgia . It has now been 2 ½ years since practicing Macrobiotics and after seeing all of the positive changes in my body, I decided to open a wellness center. I now help people and plan to continue to spread the incredible benefits of Macrobiotics.

I attended the Healthy Weight Loss Program in March 2014 to get introduced to the Kushi Institute. I have come back to take the Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1. I will be graduating next Friday from the program and will return to finish Level 2, 3 and 4 to further develop my skills. My goal and dream is to open up a healing center in Miami, Florida.

I believe everything happens for a reason, I wasn’t expecting to be ill, but I know from my recovery experience that I can help others with Fibromyalgia and other conditions from all that I’ve learned.

Please feel to contact me directly to learn more about my story at

Attended the Following Kushi Institute Programs:
Healthy Weight Loss 3/30/2014
Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1 3/29 – 4/25, 2015


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