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Christina Pirello’s Italian Nut Cookies

FullSizeRenderWe were so thrilled to have Christina and Robert Pirello join us at the Kushi Institute this Spring. Christina was a wonderful faculty addition to our Macrobiotic Leadership Program (we are looking forward to having her as guest faculty for a few days in September for Level 1). She also kicked off our 1st Saturday Seasonal Cooking with some very delicious recipes!

 

Christina Pirello’s Italian Nut Cookies with Chocolate Glaze
Makes about 24 cookies

2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
½ cup semolina flour
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch sea salt
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 stick Earth Balance baking sticks
½ cup brown rice syrup
3 tablespoons coconut sugar granules
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
½ cup coarsely chopped pecans
¼ cup coarsely chopped walnuts

chocolate glaze
¼ cup unsweetened almond or oat milk
3 tablespoons brown rice syrup
1 cup non-dairy, dark chocolate

Preheat oven to 350o and line a baking sheet with parchment.
Whisk together flour, semolina, cinnamon, salt, cocoa powder and baking powder and soda. Whip Earth Balance, syrup, coconut sugar and vanilla. Fold into flour mixture to form a soft, formable dough. Fold in nuts. Using moist hands, form dough into 1-inch spheres and arrange on baking sheet.

Bake until cookies are just firm, but still slightly soft, 18-20 minutes. Allow to cool for 2-3 minutes on baking sheet. Transfer to a wire rack and cool completely.

Make the glaze by placing almond milk and rice syrup in a small saucepan and bringing to a high boil. Pour over chocolate and whisk to form a smooth, satin-like glaze.

Slip a piece of parchment paper under the rack of cookies. Spoon glaze over each one, letting the glaze run over the sides. Allow to stand, undisturbed, until glaze begins to set. Transfer to a serving platter.  

Cook’s Tip: These cookies will keep, in a sealed container for several days.

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Yesenia Saad’s Fibromyalgia Recovery

photoI was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2011. I was struggling, feeling very fatigued. I had insomnia for many months and then became depressed. My body was sore 24/7 and I usually woke up tired, experiencing a lot of headaches and anxiety during the night.  Many people told me to start working out, but I already had a very active lifestyle. I went through 4 different anti-depressant treatments. I also took Xanax and Lyrica for the pain, but it didn’t help me. Experiencing Fibromyalgia caused me to stay in bed for about 4 to 6 months. This affected all of my relationships. At one point, I felt that cancer would be better than Fibromyalgia.
Two years after being on this medicine, I talked with one of my best friends, Salvatore Luccherino. At the time he had a Macrobiotic B&B in Portugal and currently is selling organic tempeh (http://www.salstempeh.com). Salvatore started talking to me about how the Macrobiotic diet could help with Fibromyalgia. I felt so inspired after talking with him that I booked a ticket to Portugal to learn from him in person. I stayed with Salvatore for 2 weeks while he cooked for me and showed me how to start eating a Macrobiotic diet.
While I was in Portugal, I had a macrobiotic consultation with Francisco Varatojo who owns a Macrobiotic center in Portugal, (http://www.institutomacrobiotico.com). Francisco saw that my consumption of animal products was very high and recommended that I adjust my diet. After only 2 weeks of eating a macrobiotic diet, my body started to react in a positive way. My energy returned. I finally started smiling again and felt like I was my healthy self again. I was happy, living without pain and sleeping perfectly. After 4 months, I stopped taking all of my medicine for Fibromyalgia . It has now been 2 ½ years since practicing Macrobiotics and after seeing all of the positive changes in my body, I decided to open a wellness center. I now help people and plan to continue to spread the incredible benefits of Macrobiotics.

I attended the Healthy Weight Loss Program in March 2014 to get introduced to the Kushi Institute. I have come back to take the Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1. I will be graduating next Friday from the program and will return to finish Level 2, 3 and 4 to further develop my skills. My goal and dream is to open up a healing center in Miami, Florida.

I believe everything happens for a reason, I wasn’t expecting to be ill, but I know from my recovery experience that I can help others with Fibromyalgia and other conditions from all that I’ve learned.

Please feel to contact me directly to learn more about my story at yesysaad@gmail.com.

Attended the Following Kushi Institute Programs:
Healthy Weight Loss 3/30/2014
Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1 3/29 – 4/25, 2015

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Gwen Burton’s Harvest Romance…

Macrobiotic Leadership Program

Spotlight: Gwen Burton, Current Level 3 Student

Gwen Burton is a champion of home-cooking, healthy food, and eco-friendly living. As the creator and publisher of Brown Rice Magazine, she has worked to make macrobiotic and plant-based cuisine appealing, relevant, and fun for the modern urban dweller. Gwen embodies and lives the values that she shares with her readers: synchronicity with the natural world, practicing devotion and concentration at every opportunity, and finding humor and beauty in all aspects of life. She draws on her five years of macrobiotic practice, as well as her education from the Kushi Institute and the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in order to help clients feel their best, realize their dreams, and maximize their potential to see them through. Gwen tutors individuals to hone their healthy home cooking, coaches clients to achieve wellness and peace in all aspects of life, performs private chef services, and regularly offers group workshops on fermentation throughout NYC. www.gwenburton.com

Click here to check out Gwen Burton’s Harvest Romance Yoga Pose Tutorial and begin harvesting some love in your life!

 

 

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Bringing It Home… Summer Conference

Bringing It Home: Kushi Institute Summer Conference By Alex Jack
Photos by Sachi Kato

The 2014 Macrobiotic Summer Conference exceeded everyone’s expectations. For the first time we held it on our spacious 600-acre campus here in the beautiful Berkshires. Over the course of two weeks in August, over 200 guests ate delicious daily meals (featuring vegan and gluten-free options) under a big tent and attended lectures by Michio Kushi and macrobiotic teachers, cooks, and practitioners from around the world. Gourmet chefs Eric Lechasseur and Sanae Suzuki prepared a special Gala fundraising dinner on August 15, and people danced and celebrated under the stars. Participants also enjoyed the outstanding cultural attractions of the Berkshires, including the Tanglewood Music Festival, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, and the Norman Rockwell Museum.

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Lunchtime in the tent.

The annual Aveline Kushi Awards were presented at the Summer Conference. The Aveline Award Ceremony took place at the lovely Aveline Memorial Peace Park located at the K.I. campus. Each year, the Aveline Award is presented for excellence in macrobiotic education, innovation, and service. This year’s awardees included macrobiotic senior teacher and artist Rod House (who turned eighty this year), new energy pioneers Woody and Florence Johnson, and the founder of Berkshire Mountain Bakery, Richard Bourdon.

A Macrobiotic Summer Tradition

The Macrobiotic Summer Conference has a long and storied history. In the U.S. summer conferences and camps go back to the introduction of macrobiotic education. Descended from the “New Horizon” macrobiotic summer camps held on Long Island and in the Catskills of upstate New York, the modern summer conference began in 1975 with the Amherst Summer Program held at Amherst College in Amherst Massachusetts. The first macrobiotic summer camps in the United States took place in the early ‘60s and featured lectures and classes with George and Lima Ohsawa. From that beginning, Herman and Cornellia Aihara continued the summer camp tradition in California at French Meadows from the 1970s onward, while on the East Coast, Michio and Aveline Kushi began the annual summer program at Amherst. Herman and Cornellia organized their annual summer camps as GOMF events, while the Amherst Summer Program was administered through the non-profit East West Foundation.

 The Amherst Summer Program (referred to in the macrobiotic community simply as “Amherst”) showcased the world’s leading senior macrobiotic teachers, including Michio and Aveline, Lima Ohsawa, Herman and Cornellia, Shizuko Yamamoto, and Hideo Ohmori, as well as the next generation including Lino Stanchich, Rod House, Cecil Levin, Murray Snyder, Evan Root, Bill Tara, Ron Kotsch, Marc Van Cauwenberghe, Jack Garvey, Denny Waxman, Bob Carr, Michael Rossoff, David and Cynthia Briscoe, Edward Esko, Wendy Esko, Diana Avoli, Adelbert and Weike Nelissen, Bill Spear, John Mann, and many others. Special guests and celebrities, including Bill Dufty and Gloria Swanson, also participated.

 Aside from the world-class educational program and lovely campus at Amherst College, the Amherst Program featured gourmet macrobiotic meals prepared by the staff of the Seventh Inn macrobiotic restaurant in Boston under the guidance of master chef, Hiroshi Hayashi. Hundreds of people from around the world attended the Amherst Program and considered it to be the high point of their yearly schedule.

 In the 1980s, the Amherst Program evolved into the annual Kushi Institute Summer Conference. The K.I. Conference adopted most of the features of the Amherst Program and expanded the roster of teachers even further. Over the years, the Summer Conference was held at a variety of venues in the New England and New York area, including Simon’s Rock College, Chimney Corners Camp, the University of Massachusetts, Westfield State University, and Babson College, all in Massachusetts, Bryant College in Rhode Island, Green Mountain College in Vermont, and more recently, the IBM Conference Center in New York and the Dolce Conference Center in New Jersey. For over three decades, thousands of people have participated in the Kushi Institute Macrobiotic Summer Conference, with teachers and attendees coming from around the world.

Exercise with Lino Stanchich.

 

Full Circle

The 2014 Conference was special in that it was the first time the Conference was held at the K.I. In order to accommodate guests, the Institute rented a spacious canopied tent. Participants stayed in the cozy Main House and North Hall dormitory. Off-campus accommodation was made available at area motels. Regular shuttle service aided participants with their transportation needs. Marisa Marinelli, a student of macrobiotics and event coordinator for the New York City Ballet, coordinated the 2014 Conference.

Lectures and cooking classes took place throughout the day, held in the K.I. Main House living room and kitchen and the North Hall library and chapel. The tent was reserved for meals, Michio Kushi lectures, and evening keynote presentations, as well as for the Gala dinner. In addition to K.I. Resident Faculty, Guest Faculty came in from all over the country and taught intensively for several days straight. Jane and Lino Stanchich came from North Carolina to teach, David and Cynthia Briscoe, Nadine Barner, and Larry Kushi came from California, Denny and Susan Waxman, Janet Lacey, and Robert and Christina Pirello came from Pennsylvania, Ginny Harper came from Tennessee, David Sergel came from Connecticut, Verne Varona and Susan Krieger came from New York, Gabrielle Kushi came from Minnesota, Dr. Henry Edward Altenberg came from Maine, and Larry and Judy Mackenny came from Florida. Phiya Kushi came from Alaska, as did many of the cooking staff. Michael Potter drove from Michigan to the Conference on his motorcycle!

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Cooking in the Main House with Christina Pirello.

A number of next generation K.I. guest teachers, including Angelica Kushi, Anthony Dissen, Carol Wasserman, Christine Waltermeyer, Marisa Marinelli, Flor Marques, and Daniel Esko, also gave classes. Patricio Garcia Parades, Director of Education at the Kushi Institute in Japan, journeyed from Tokyo via the Macrobiotic Summer Conference in Holland to present a series of international cooking workshops.

As a special feature, the K.I. held a “SuperLevel” course during the Conference. In addition to their regular leadership-training curriculum, participants in the K.I. Level 1 Program had the opportunity to attend Summer Conference events including evening keynote presentations by guest teachers together with Michio’s lectures.

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Delicious, macrobiotic meals served 3 times daily.

The response was uniformly positive and enthusiastic. The hardworking K.I. staff and resident and visiting teachers did an excellent job. We thank them and thank our sponsors, donors, and participants. Bob and Christina Pirello told us, “Don’t ever go back (to hotels and corporate conference centers.) Keep the Conference here at the K.I.!” Jane and Lino commented, “The 2014 Kushi Institute Summer Conference was like being in Macrobiotic Heaven! Delicious, balanced macrobiotic food was skillfully prepared and served in an airy tent where friends gathered with music, conversations, and laughter.” Gabrielle Kushi had this to say, “The 2014 Macrobiotic Summer Conference was like a breath of fresh air. The new venue provided chefs, teachers, volunteers, and students alike a chance to support each other on a totally new level, thus providing immense individual and community growth.” David and Cynthia Briscoe summed up the positive consensus by remarking, “What a refreshing experience! It was wonderful to have the grass beneath our feet; trees all around, fresh air, and to feel so relaxed on the KI grounds. It quickly became a family gathering, with plenty of time to make new friends and reconnect with old ones. The food, prepared by the passionate and creative K.I. chefs, was delicious.”

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Cynthia and David Briscoe.

Summer Conference 2015

From July 26 to August 9, 2015, the Macrobiotic Summer Conference will meet once again on the beautiful K.I. campus. We invite you to join us. We are now accepting registrations for this event. Participants can take either SuperLevel 1 and receive credit for our flagship Leadership Program featuring teacher, counselor, and chef training, or attend the Public Program with a plant-based smorgasbord of exciting lectures, cooking classes, and exercise workshops. You can enroll for 1-week or 2-week stays, weekends, or for the day.

Please register early to reserve your room, as campus housing is very limited and will sell out soon. K.I. shuttles will transport people staying off campus to selected Berkshire area motels. Call our registration office to register or for a list of participating motels and the special discounts they offer our participants. For more information call 413-623-5741 x102 and talk to Marisa Marinelli.

Alex Jack is the Executive Director of the Kushi Institute. He is the author of numerous books on macrobiotics, including, with Michio Kushi, The Cancer Prevention Diet, One Peaceful World, and The Macrobiotic Path to Total Health. The above article was published in Macrobiotics Today.

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Interview with K.I. Faculty Edward Esko

EdEskoBrown Rice Magazine Interview with K.I. Senior Faculty Edward Esko
By Gwen Burton

Brown Rice: When I think about the way that healthy eating has been adopted in our culture over the past few decades, I am struck by how macrobiotics seems to have been such a major player. I can see how it might be encouraging that healthy food options are proliferating and easily accessible, but also frustrating because people seem to believe they don’t have time to cook for themselves and many of these healthy food options employ the “fast food” model. What has it been like to participate in and witness the change in eating in the US over the decades? What is your opinion on where we are today?

EE: Many of the things macrobiotic teachers advocated in the 1960s and 1970s have now become mainstream. Let’s look at several core principles, starting with the concept of “fresh, local, and organic.” I first heard the idea of eating locally in Michio Kushi’s early lectures. Fresh, local, and seasonal foods were touted as the way to achieve sustainability, both in terms of personal health and our relationship to the environment. We went out of our way to support local organic growers and suppliers. We gave classes and published books such as “The Changing Seasons Macrobiotic Cookbook” that explained how to cook with the seasons.

Now, four star restaurants in Manhattan feature fresh, local, and organic produce. Seasonal cooking and shopping at farmer’s markets has become fashionable. Macrobiotics was way ahead of the curve on that.

Let’s take another core principle, the superiority of plant-based diets. When I first read George Ohsawa’s comment that the human body is perfectly equipped to process plant foods directly, without hiring middlemen such as cows or pigs, it made perfect sense. Also that a whole-grain- and vegetable-based diet has many advantages over an animal-based diet. A light bulb also went off when Ohsawa stated that cow’s milk was perfect food, for baby cows! I had been a big milk-drinker up to that time but hearing such common sense was a revelation. As with the other core macrobiotic principles, the notion that plant-based diets are superior has gained traction with leading-edge thinkers in nutrition and public health, including T. Colin Campbell, Neal Barnard, M.D., Dean Ornish, M.D., and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Another core principle that has become obvious today is the idea that whole foods are superior to refined and process foods. The term “whole foods” was actually invented by Michio’s inner circle in Cambridge around 1965. Now it has become part of the culture. Several years ago, the Harvard School of Public Health announced it would start promoting brown rice in place of white rice to stem the rise of diabetes in China. Brown rice is a whole food, white rice is a highly processed food.

Brown Rice: To what extent did the idea of “non-credo” shape the early macrobiotic movement, and do you think that this notion has been forgotten or passed over in the current era of health coaching and commercialized regimens? What is the role of non-credo in developing judgment?

EE: “Non-credo,” or “do not believe,” has always been at the center of macrobiotic philosophy. It always will. The only way to real self-knowledge is through your own practice and discovery. Macrobiotics is about freedom, pure and simple, not following someone else’s ideas.

Brown Rice: I’m curious about the tendencies of the long-term macrobiotic practitioner. Is it natural, in your experience, to want to self-experiment after having achieved a certain degree of mastery in the kitchen and with one’s own condition? It occurs to me that this tendency could either be a way of continuing one’s education in a way that could benefit others in the future, or might possibly be a manifestation of arrogance.

EE: The bottom line is that there is nothing other than self-experiment. It’s the nature of reality and not at all arrogance.

Brown Rice: What are your opinions on veganism? Macrobiotic diets include a small amount of white meat fish and some other seafood, but currently, attaining good-quality seafood is almost impossible. Now that I am vegan, I wonder about the ethical implications of causing the suffering and death of other beings, and I wonder why this might be acceptable according to macrobiotic philosophy, which otherwise seems concerned with facilitating peace on the entire planet through diet.

EE: Eating grains and vegetables means they have to die so that you live. The question is which types of foods make that sacrifice willingly and which resist. It seems to me animals are quite resistant to being killed and eaten as food for humans. Grains and vegetables seem quite willing to become human food. Similarly, billions of microscopic bacteria sacrifice themselves every time you enjoy miso soup, natto, or sauerkraut.

The Chinese character for peace, “Wa,” is made up of images for “cereal grain” and “mouth.” They apparently understood that eating grains and vegetables led to a peaceful mentality.

Brown Rice: There is an exciting project to grow rice in the Berkshires. Have these efforts been successful? I recently heard a rumor that at one point in time, macrobiotic founder George Ohsawa only ate rice immediately after it had been harvested. What does fresh rice taste like? Do you notice a big difference in taste and energy?

EE: Fresh harvest rice is for ceremonial purposes only, not for daily consumption. I’m sure Ohsawa enjoyed it on special occasions. We had the pleasure to enjoy freshly harvested rice from South River Miso on special occasions as well, such as Kushi Institute graduation ceremonies, my 60th birthday celebration, and others.

Check www.VermontRice.com for updates on rice growing in New England. Also look at www.SouthRiverMiso.com for rice growing and local production of miso in Western Mass.

Brown Rice: What is your diet like now? What kinds of foods are you attracted to after decades of macrobiotic practice?

EE: Onigiri (nori rice balls), soba (buckwheat noodles) in broth, natto (fermented soybean) rolls and melt-in-your-mouth salmon sashimi at Bizen, the Japanese macrobiotic restaurant in Great Barrington, Mass., vegan hummus sandwiches at Guido’s in Pittsfield, where I live, and water-sauteed green vegetables with brown rice vinegar or lemon.

Brown Rice: The Kushi Institute operates in MA. Are there any opportunities for NYC residents to learn more about the diet and the practice?

EE: My lectures in NYC offer an opportunity to experience Kushi Macrobiotic Education. Also, we would like to offer more extensive programs, such as Kushi Instititute (KI) Level One Certificate Programs in NYC beginning in the fall of 2014. Also, the Berkshires, where the KI is located, are not far from NYC. Just drive north up the lovely Taconic Parkway or the NY Throughway. We have a very special Summer Conference coming up in August that should be of interest to New Yorkers. Michio Kushi and more than twenty leading macrobiotic teachers will be presenting. The Conference will include vegan macrobiotic meals plus cultural events including the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Tanglewood Music Festival, the South River Miso rice field, and others. Go to KushiInstitute.org for ongoing updates.

The above interview was conducted by Gwen Burton and published in Brown Rice Magazine. Contact www.BrownRiceMagazine.com.

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In Honor of Michio Kushi

michio banner

Michio Kushi Tribute HI RES

Dear Friends,

We would like to honor Michio Kushi, macrobiotic educator, natural food pioneer and founder of Kushi Institute.  Michio passed away peacefully on December 28, surrounded by his loving wife Midori and sons Norio, Haruo, Phiya, and Hisao. He was 88 years old.  On behalf of the students, staff, and faculty of the Kushi Institute, we extend our heartfelt sympathy to the Kushi family.

Michio was actively involved in K.I. planning and development until just prior to his passing. His vision for the institute was to teach, guide, and inspire individuals towards greater personal freedom, health, and happiness.  The Kushi Institute plans to assure his teachings and mission will continue. 

Click for a more complete list of Michio Kushi’s achievements

As a result of the hard work and dedication of the K.I. staff, the support of our students and participants, and the generosity of our donors, the Institute ended 2014 on a very positive note. We have been successful in reaching the Institute’s goal of establishing the first Annual Fund and have raised sufficient funds contributing to general operating expenses. The work of K.I. counselors and teachers helped contribute to numerous success stories for individuals and families in their quest for better health and well being. 

The Institute’s core programs, the Macrobiotic Leadership Training Program and the Way to Health Program were well attended in 2014. The annual Kushi Institute Summer Conference, held for the first time in Becket MA, was a resounding success, and continues to bring in excitement as we plan for the upcoming 2015 event, July 26 thru August 9.  The K.I. also launched several exciting new programs designed to help those with specific conditions, including The Macrobiotic Approach to PsoriasisControlling Crohn’s and Colitis thru Diet, and The Natural Approach to Breast Cancer. We are now planning to introduce a variety of new workshops and seminars in 2015 to continue in this work. 

The K.I. also has ambitious plans for 2015 and beyond. In our last message, we introduced the Macrobiotic Breast Cancer Study. The Kushi Institute is now in discussion with medical researchers at Tufts University and Johns Hopkins University Medical School to begin the first ever randomized clinical trial on the effects of the macrobiotic diet on advanced cancer of the breast. Our hope is that the Macrobiotic Breast Cancer Study will revolutionize the treatment of this disease, so that a natural plant-based diet becomes a standard part of breast cancer treatment and recovery. The Institute has submitted a detailed proposal for a comprehensive macrobiotic care program for study participants. The K.I. hopes to complete the planning phase and move toward implementation this year. Please check kushiinstitute.org for ongoing developments.

To further Michio’s lifetime work of training a new generation of macrobiotic teachers, counselors, and chefs, the K.I. is planning to introduce the Macrobiotic Internship Program in 2015. Qualified participants will have the opportunity to assist K.I. counselors and teachers in personal counseling sessions, lectures, and cooking classes. More details will be announced on this program shortly.

We ask for your support in helping us continue Michio’s vision of health, peace, and sustainability through the macrobiotic way of life. You can support the K.I. by attending a program, recommending the K.I. to friends and family, purchasing high-quality foods and supplies from the Kushi Store, or making a tax-deductible donation the Kushi Institute Annual Fund. We’d like to thank those who have already contributed. It is with much appreciation and gratitude that we will continue the legacy and further the dream of one peaceful world.

On behalf of the staff, faculty, and students of the Kushi Institute, we wish you a healthy and happy New Year.

Alex Jack
Edward Esko 

Let us honor his wonderful life. We invite you to share below.

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Holiday Stuffed Squash

Holiday Stuffed Squash

Stuffed Squash

1 medium-sized blue Hubbard Squash or other hard winter squash of similar size
1 tbsp corn or sesame oil
1 cup onions, deiced
1 cup celery, diced
Pinch of sea salt
8 cups whole wheat or whole wheat sourdough bread cubes, slightly dried out or toasted in a dry skillet until golden brown
2 cups cooked seitan cubed
shoyu
1 1/2 – 2 cups seitan gravy

Carefully cut out a round section off the top of the squash, just as you would for a jack-o-lantern, and set it aside. Clean out all the seeds and set aside. Heal oil in a skillet and saute the onions for 1-2 minutes. Add the celery and a pinch of salt. Saute for 1 to 2 minutes more. Place this mixture in a large mixing bowl and add the dried or toasted bread cubes and seitan and mix well. Add a small amount of shoyu and mix again. Stuff the hollowed squash completely full. Pour the seitan gravy over the stuffing and let it seep down. Place the top back on the squash.  Oil the outside skin of the squash with a small amount of sesame oil. Place the stuffed squash on a baking tray or over roaster and bake at 325 F for about 2 hours. To test for doneness, use a shish kebob stick or chopstick to push the hard skin. When it goes through easily, it is done. Serve with seitan gravy after scooping out the stuffing and squash for each person.

Variation: use sauteed vegetables together with cooked brown rice and wild rice, kasha and vegetables, or millet and vegetables. Add sliced mushrooms, almonds or pine nuts to stuffing.

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The Holiday Hangover Helper

The Holiday Hangover Helper

The Winter holiday season brings potential hangover weather with it. To avoid the pitfalls of lethargy, depression, and nausea after those gatherings with family and loved ones, try a few macrobiotic tips!

1. Get out of the house and get some fresh air!

2. Exercise twenty-one minutes daily to alleviate the depression and raise the oxygen levels depleted by a lack of sleep and too much booze.

3. Bring on the carbohydrates!  One half a sourdough whole wheat bagel with tofu cream cheese and chives can lift the blood sugar that has usually tanked from too much ethanol.

4. Have miso soup and a few seaweed nori rolls to help the liver flush out a toxic molecule that gets created when the alcohol is broken down.

5. For dinner, eat a bowl of pasta with lentils, a touch of roasted garlic, chopped parsley, olive oil, and salt and pepper.  This will give the body the fuel it needs to push out all the toxic byproducts of alcohol metabolism.

6. To quell the nausea, eat 1/4 teaspoon of umeboshi paste.

7. Besides kukicha tea, the beverage of choice for people in usual good health under these circumstances would be green or black tea because they contain good-guy polyphenols, which enhance a quick recovery.  By adding (preferably organic) fresh ginger – peeled, sliced, pounded, chopped, and put into the tea to be eaten after its been drunk – you will only increase the benefits.

Salute!

Article courtesy of Elizabeth G. Karaman

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Korean Student’s Journey To Macrobiotics

Korean Student’s Journey To Macrobiotics

Meet Jiyoon Kim
Graduate of our Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Levels 1,2, and 3

I discovered macrobiotics 2 years ago. Before I found macrobiotics, I quit my very stressful job. I had been struggling with poor blood circulation, hypoglycemia, and had gained over 10 lbs. I began to feel I could no longer control my condition. These changes in my health were causing me concern because my fathers’ mother had passed away from diabetes. Also, my mother’s father and mother passed away very early from liver cancer and kidney disease respectively. Furthermore, my uncle and aunt are struggling with diabetes presently.

With above concerns, I deeply wanted a new healthy lifestyle for my family and myself. I began doing a lot of Internet research specifically related to cooking, food, and their connection with our health. During my search I was intrigued by a new term I came across, “macrobiotics”. I found the teachings to be rational even though I was not a vegan. I felt that macrobiotic philosophy was very well-founded, and the concepts and principles resonated with me greatly. Searching for further information, Kushi Institute was listed as the first resource for macrobiotic. This is where I would be spending three months of my life bringing myself back to harmony, and opening new experiences.

When I registered for Kushi Institute’s Macrobiotic Leadership program, I expected that I would only be learning about macrobiotic cooking. I was very pleasantly surprised. The learning was much more comprehensive. It included philosophy (the principles of yin and yang), history, shiatsu, and visual diagnosis. Since arriving at the Kushi Institute back in September, I feel so much lighter. My first week here, I lost almost 9 lbs! Moreover, I felt changes happening in my body, and experienced a lot of discharging from all of the bad foods I had been eating. I sense my health has improved immensely.

During the last couple of months I have been learning to balance my diet. I used to be addicted to sweet things. I craved a lot of sugar. After I read some books and learned about macrobiotics, I tried to keep away from sugar. I have successfully replaced standard sweeteners with acceptable macrobiotic substitutes, and I do not miss them! Immersing myself at the Kushi Institute, I acquired a deeper understanding of all the diverse macrobiotic concepts, and felt passionately that this could benefit the entire world. I would love to take part in spreading this wisdom all over the world.

In Korea, macrobiotic instructors are few and far between, and their focus is primarily on cooking. When I took macrobiotic cooking classes in Korea, I felt as though it was not enough. I felt I needed to learn the whole concept. I believe that Kushi Institute provided this missing gap. When I took a quick visit to South Korea 2 weeks ago, my mother was so happy! She looked at me and said, “You look much brighter and healthier.” This confirmed what I have been feeling, and further fueled my determination and practice. Her comments made me realize I am on the right path.

Before coming to Kushi Institute, I was planning to further pursue nutrition, food, and health. Now I want to make a bridge connecting these interests and macrobiotics. I am confident that it could benefit young and old alike to be more aware of their diet and lifestyle choices. For my next step, I’ve made the decision to attend graduate school for Public Health and Nutrition. After, making this decision, I experienced a wonderful feeling of satisfaction. I think this moment is the biggest turning point in my life.

 

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