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Dandelion Condiment

Dandelion Condiment
Dandelion Condiment
This condiment is a tasty accompaniment to whole grains. Dandelions are nourishing to the liver. This condiment is beneficial in the spring when the liver is most active.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 yellow onion, small dice
  2. 1 bunch dandelion greens, trimmed and finely chopped
  3. 1-2 t light sesame oil
  4. 2 T tahini
  5. 1 T chickpea or white miso
Instructions
  1. Heat sesame oil in small saute pan to medium high.
  2. Saute the onion until softened and translucent. Add the dandelion greens and saute for a few more minutes.
  3. Add 1/3 cup water to pan. Cover and simmer until greens are tender, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add tahini and miso to pan and stir until well blended.
  5. Simmer for another minute. Remove from heat and enjoy!
Notes
  1. Kushi Executive Chef Simone Parris [@simoneskitchen8] contributed this recipe. Simone has been cooking for twenty years in many different capacities. Her passion is to create balanced, wholesome cuisine using the freshest organic ingredients, emphasizing grains, beans, sea and land vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds. Simone’s culinary experience includes catering, retreats, special events, and personal chefing for clients who want to experience a healthy way of eating and living. http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Sweet Corn Tamales

Sweet Corn Tamales
Sweet Corn Tamales
Kushi Executive Chef Simone Parris [@simoneskitchen8] contributed this recipe. Simone has been cooking for twenty years in many different capacities. Her passion is to create balanced, wholesome cuisine using the freshest organic ingredients, emphasizing grains, beans, sea and land vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds. Simone’s culinary experience includes catering, retreats, special events, and personal chefing for clients who want to experience a healthy way of eating and living. http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
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For the tamales
  1. 24 corn husks
For the tamale dough
  1. 3 1/2 cups organic masa harina
  2. 2 cups fresh or frozen organic sweet corn
  3. 1 t sea salt
  4. 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  5. water, enough for consistent doughy feel
For the filling
  1. 2 yellow onions, small dice
  2. 1 cup burdock, small dice
  3. 2 cups carrots, small dice
  4. 1 T extra virgin olive oil
  5. 1 T Shoyu (natural soy sauce)
For the tamales
  1. Soak tamales in tepid water overnight.
For the tamale dough
  1. Combine all tamale dough ingredients and set aside.
For the tamale filling
  1. Add olive oil to a sauté pan, heat to medium and sauté first the burdock followed by onions. Saute a few minutes until onions translucent. Add a pinch of salt, a little water, cover pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Add shoyu and remove pan from heat.
For assembly
  1. Take a 1/3 cup of tamale dough and roll into a smooth ball. Place in one palm and gently flatten into a rectangular shape. Spoon about 1-2 T tamale filling into the center of your dough and close dough around it.
  2. Wrap each of your tamale dough shapes with two corn husks and tie with cotton string to hold together.
To cook tamales
  1. Place assembled tamales in a steamer and steam for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Check to see if done. Enjoy with your favorite toppings or condiments!
Notes
  1. You will need two corn husks per tamale and depending on the size of your tamale, you should be able to make about 12 from this recipe. You can purchase corn husks from a Hispanic market.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Delicious Sesame Seed Dressing!

This recipe results in a rich, slightly salty dressing.  It’s delicious on cooked vegetables and raw salads and pretty much anything else!

toasted sesame seed dressing 2

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups raw unhealed white sesame seeds
  • 2 bunches scallions, sliced in rings
  • 1/2 cup umeboshi vinegar
  • 1/4 cup water

Instructions:

  • Toast sesame seeds in a skillet on medium to high heat.  Seeds are toasted when they begin to pop.  Watch skillet carefully and move seeds with a wooden spoon so they don’t burn.  
  • Add all ingredients to blender and blend until liquified.
  • Taste for flavor and add scallions and vinegar, to taste.  Add more water if necessary for a creamy consistency.

Note:  It’s helpful to have toasted sesame seeds on hand.  You can store them in a glass container.  They can be used in a variety of dishes or for garnish.  The umeboshi vinegar gives this dish a salty flavor.  Its has a distinct flavor, so add moderately and taste as you go.  

 

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Macro Deviled “Eggs” Appetizer

Impress your in-laws at the next family gathering with this amazing recipe!  Contributed by Mirea Ellis.

  • Serves 16 (or more)macro deviled eggs

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 lb. lotus seeds (about 65 seeds)
  • 4t Eden brand yellow mustard
  • 2T dill pickle juice (organic and unpasteurized)
  • 2T rice syrup
  • 2T rice vinegar
  • 8 small to medium yellow onions
  • 2T yellow onion, minced
  • 1t paprika

Instructions:

  • For lotus seeds:
    • Soak lotus seeds for 6 hours (minimum).  
    • Place lotus seeds along with their soaking water to a pressure cooker.  Water level should be 1 in. higher than seeds.  Add water if necessary.  Bring to pressure and cook for 1/2 hour.  [Alternatively, you can simmer seeds for 1 hour, adding water if necessary to keep seeds covered.  Tilt lid slightly to release steam so liquid does not foam over.]
    • Strain seeds with a strainer or colander and place in a bowl to cool.  
    • Place seeds in food processor with yellow mustard, pickle juice, rice syrup, and rice vinegar.  4t Eden brand yellow mustard.
  • For egg whites:
    • Add water to pot and insert steamer basket [water level should not rise above basket], cover and bring to a boil.
    • Cut onions in half lengthwise.  Remove skins while trying to keep root intact [this will keep the onion intact.]
    • Make a hollow in each onion half:  make a small horizontal line on both top and bottom of onion [flat side], do not cut all the way through – outside layers should remain intact.  Scoop out with a paring knife.  
    • Place onions halves flat side down in the steamer basket.  Steam for 15 min.  You may have to batch them unless you have a really big steamer basket!!
    • Remove onions when cooked to a plate, flat side down.
  • For assembling both:
    • Turn onions until flat side up.  Spoon lotus seeds into each onion half, being careful to keep filling in the hollow for a neat look.
    • Sprinkle each onion half with minced onion and paprika.  

 

 

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A Visit to South River Miso – by Ed Esko

We are fortunate to be close enough to take Kushi Institute Level students for a visit to South River Miso to see how miso is made. Below Kushi Associate Director Ed Esko writes about a recent trip. 

– – – – – – – –

south river miso

In May, a group of students from the Level I Leadership Program and I took a tour of the South River Miso Company located nearby in Conway, Mass. South River has been producing high quality handcrafted organic miso for over twenty years.

Founder, Christian Elwell guided our group on a tour of the facility. Aside from traditional barley and brown rice miso, Christian introduced the students to several new varieties developed uniquely at South River, including chickpea and azuki bean. He explained the process of making miso from beginning to end, and how miso is a living food and an essential part of a healthful diet.

Growing Rice in Massachusetts!

A high point of the tour was when Christian told the group about his success in growing rice on the property. Beginning with rice seeds from Ukraine, Christian has succeeded in planting and harvesting a small plot of organic rice. I had the opportunity to taste the South River rice on a previous visit and can vouch for the fact that it was quite delicious.

Christian explained how the rice paddy is a complete eco-system, home to a myriad of life forms, from dragon flies to tiny frogs. Everyone was inspired by the creativity, commitment to the health of our planet, and harmony with nature exemplified by South River Miso.

Originally published on our site – 6/12/13 – Kushi Library & Resources-Articles.  Republished 11/13/15.

 

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Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut
Sauerkraut
This delicious way of preparing cabbage is believed to have originated in Mongolia and spread to the West. Like numa pickles, sauerkraut may be prepared in large quantities in a wooden keg or ceramic crock.
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Ingredients
  1. 5 lbs. cabbage, very thinly shredded
  2. 1/3 cup sea salt
Instructions
  1. Put the shredded cabbage in bowl. Add the sea salt and massage well until water is released.
  2. Transfer to a wooden keg or ceramic crock.
  3. Place a wooden disk or plate on top of the cabbage.
  4. Place one or several clean rocks or another heavy weight on top of the plate or disk to supply pressure on the cabbage.
  5. The water level in the crock should rise up to or above the plate or disk within 10-20 hours. If the fluid level exceeds the disk, reduce some of the pressure. If not enough water comes out, add a little more salt or increase the weight on top.
  6. Keep in a cool dark place for 1 1/2 to 2 weeks.
  7. Check the sauerkraut every day.
  8. If mold starts to form on top, remove and discard it at once before it spreads and spoils the whole batch.
  9. Before eating, rinse the kraut with cold water.
  10. It will keep stored in a container with its juice for a week or more in the refrigerator.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Cucumber Dill Pickles

Cucumber Dill Pickles
Cucumber Dill Pickles
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Ingredients
  1. 5 pickling cucumbers (Kirby)
  2. 3 bay leaves
  3. 4 cups water
  4. 1/2 stalk fresh dill
  5. 1/3 cup sea salt
  6. 1-3 raw cabbage leaves
Instructions
  1. Bring water and salt to boil in a pot. Simmer until salt is fully dissolved. Cool.
  2. Cut cucumbers in quarter length pieces and let them dry for a few hours in a bamboo strainer or collander.
  3. Place cucumbers, dill, and bay leaves in a jar.
  4. Add salt water and cover with a cheesecloth or raw cabbage leaves.
  5. Keep in a cool place for a few days and then place in refrigerator.
  6. Pickles will be ready in about a week.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Sachi’s French Lentil Pate

Sachi’s French Lentil Pate
Sachi's French Lentil Pate
A recipe typical of foods enjoyed in France post World War II. Featured in Amberwaves & Macrobiotic Path, Autumn 2015.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup dry French lentils
  2. 1 cup walnuts
  3. 1 T olive oil
  4. 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  5. 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  6. 1/4 t sea salt
  7. 6 medium shitake mushrooms, sliced
  8. 1-2 t white miso
  9. 1 t ume paste
  10. 1 t dried basil
  11. 3 T fresh parsley, minced for garnish
Instructions
  1. 1. Sort and wash lentils. Place them in a saucepan and cover them with water - up to 1/2 in.
  2. 2. Bring to a boil, skim off white foam that forms on surface.
  3. 3. Cover the pot and simmer until lentils are cooked, about 35-45 min.
  4. 4. Drain lentils and set aside.
  5. 5. Saute onion and garlic in oil and sea salt until onions are translucent.
  6. 6. Add shitake mushrooms and sautee another 5 min. Set aside to cool.
  7. 7. In a small skillet, toast walnuts until they become crispy and light golden in color. Be careful not to burn. Set aside to cool.
  8. 8. Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until smooth.
  9. 9. Taste and adjust seasonings.
  10. 10. Garnish with fresh parsley.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Creamy Fennel Soup

Creamy Fennel Soup
Creamy Fennel Soup
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
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For soup
  1. 2 cups yellow onions, thin-sliced half moons
  2. 2-4 good size fennel heads, cut into 1/2 in. cubes
  3. green fennel sprigs, finely chopped
  4. 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  5. 2 in. piece kombu
  6. 2 cups unsweetened soy milk
  7. sea salt, to taste
  8. 1-2 Tbsp umeboshi vinegar
  9. one lemon zested and juiced
  10. 1/4 cup scallions, thinly sliced (for garnish)
  11. 6 pieces lemon slices (for garnish)
  12. freshly ground black pepper (for garnish)
For garlic croutons (for garnish) - optional
  1. 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  2. 1 garlic clove, minced
  3. 3 thick slices whole wheat sourdough bread, cut into cubes
For soup
  1. Sauté the onions in the extra virgin olive oil in the pan you intend to use for the soup.
  2. Add a pinch of sea salt and sauté onions until translucent.
  3. Add the fennel to the onions and sauté another few minutes.
  4. Add another pinch of sea salt, the Kombu and 2 cups of water.
  5. Bring to a boil then cover and turn down to simmer on low for 10 minutes
  6. Remove Kombu and use an immersion blender to blend the soup
  7. Return to low flame; add the chopped fennel sprigs, the milk (enough to acquire desired consistency) and the umeboshi vinegar to taste.
  8. Simmer for a few more minutes. Do not boil again as the milk may curdle.
  9. Remove pan from heat and stir in lemon juice and the lemon zest, both to taste.
  10. Garnish with black pepper, lemon slices, scallions, and croutons, serve hot and enjoy!
For garlic croutons
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
  2. Add olive oil to a large sauté pan over medium heat.
  3. Stir in garlic and cook for 1 minute - watch carefully as it burns easily.
  4. Add breadcrumbs and toss to coat.
  5. Spread on a baking sheet.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes or until crisp. Check regularly to prevent burning. Cool.
Notes
  1. For a richer tastier soup you can first roast the fennel – preheat oven to 350 F. Toss the cut fennel with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast for 10-15 minutes before adding to onions. No need to sauté fennel if you are roasting it.
  2. Trimming the fennel: Take off the tough outside layer and trim the top stalks as they can be tough. Cut off the little green sprigs if there are any, to flavor soup at the end.
  3. The lemon slices on top are a pretty garnish and add flavor. The lemon juice and zest are a nice addition too.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Tempeh Bacon

Tempeh Bacon
Tempeh Bacon
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
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Ingredients
  1. 1 lb Tempeh
  2. ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  3. ¼ cup maple syrup
  4. ¼ cup olive oil
  5. 3 Tbsp shoyu
  6. 1 tsp liquid smoke (optional but very tasty)
  7. 1 tsp smoked paprika powder
  8. ½ tsp yellow mustard powder
  9. Freshly ground black pepper (optional)
  10. Smoked sea salt
Instructions
  1. Cut the tempeh in thin strips about 1/3 inch thick.
  2. Combine the remaining ingredients except the smoked sea salt in a bowl and whisk.
  3. Arrange the tempeh in a baking dish and pour the marinade over the tempeh.
  4. Allow tempeh to marinate for ½ hour or more, turning once or twice to get both sides saturated.
  5. Sprinkle with a little smoked sea salt right before baking.
  6. Bake in pre-heated oven at 375F for about 20 minutes or until liquid is absorbed and tempeh is nicely browned.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Hijiki Strudel

Hijiki Strudel
Hijiki Strudel
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
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Strudel Crust
  1. 1½ cups organic unbleached white or spelt flour
  2. 1 tsp baking powder
  3. ½ tsp fine sea salt
  4. ½ cup chlled organic corn oil, room temperature coconut oil or chilled deodorized sunflower oil
  5. 1/4 - 1/2 cup chilled apple juice
  6. 1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
Strudel filling
  1. 1 cup hijiki – soaked in cold water to cover
  2. 3 onions – cut in thin half moons
  3. 2 carrots – cut in matchsticks
  4. 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  5. 2 Tbsp shoyu
  6. ½ cup chopped scallions or parsley
  7. 2 Tbsp white tahini
Strudel Crust
  1. Sift flours, baking powder and sea salt; rub in oil until pebbles appear.
  2. Mix apple cider vinegar with apple juice then press with a fork until dough forms.
  3. For a super flaky crust touch and handle the dough as little as possible.
  4. Cover with a cold wet cloth and refrigerate for about 20 minutes.
Studel filling
  1. Heat oil to medium heavy saute pan. Saute onions with a pinch of sea salt for several minutes.
  2. Add hijiki and continue to sautee for several more minutes.
  3. Add 1/2 cup water, cover. When steam builds up, turn to low and simmer 20 minutes.
  4. Layer carrots on top. Cover and continue to simmer 10 minutes.
  5. Remove lid. Add shoyu and cook down excess liquid.
  6. Remove from heat and stir in scallions or parsley and tahini.
Cooking the strudel
  1. Preheat the oven to 375F.
  2. Roll out the strudel dough between two sheets baking paper in a large rectangular shape.
  3. Spoon a thick, three inch wide layer of the seaweed onto the pastry about 2 inches from the edge closest to you.
  4. Next fold that 2 inch edge onto the seaweed and fold the strudel and seal the edge and the ends.
  5. Still working with the strudel on the baking paper, lift the baking paper to move the strudel onto a baking tray.
  6. Bake at 375 °F until golden brown, about 20-25 minutes.
  7. Allow to cool slightly before cutting.
Notes
  1. Crust recipe makes about three strudel crusts.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Millet with Rice

Millet with Rice
Millet with Rice*
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Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups organic millet
  2. 3/4 cup organic short grain brown rice
  3. 4 cups water
  4. Pinch of sea salt
Instructions
  1. Wash millet in water. Strain and soak in 2 1/2 cups water overnight or at least 2 hours.
  2. Wash rice in water. Strain and soak in 1 1/2 cups water overnight.
  3. Strain millet and rice and add both to a pot.
  4. Add 4 cups water. Soaking water may be used.
  5. Add salt to taste.
  6. Bring to a boil, reduce to low heat and place flame deflector under pot.
  7. Simmer covered for 1 hour or until cooked through.
  8. Remove from flame and place in a serving dish.
Notes
  1. *Recipe from Kushi Institute Macrobiotic Leadership Program - Level 1
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Pinto Beans & Carrots

Pinto Beans & Carrots
Pinto Beans & Carrots*
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Ingredients
  1. 2 cups pinto beans, washed & soaked overnight
  2. 1 piece kombu (1-2"), soaked & sliced
  3. 1/2 cup celery, diced
  4. 1 cup onion, diced
  5. 1/2 cup carrot, diced
  6. 2 tsp barley miso, pureed in 1/4 cup water
Instructions
  1. Discard soaking water from beans and rinse beans.
  2. Place kombu on bottom of heavy pot & add soaked pinto beans on top of kombu.
  3. Add enough water to just cover beans. Bring them to a boil and skim off any foam that rises. Reduce flame and simmer about 20 min.
  4. Cover pot with heavy lid and reduce flame to medium-low & simmer until 70-80% done (about 1 1/2-2 hrs), adding water occasionally as needed while the beans are cooking. This is the "shocking method" of cooking beans.
  5. When beans are 70-80% done, add celery, onion, carrot. Cover and continue to cook for another 30 min. or until tender.
  6. Add dissolved miso into the beans. Continue to cook another 10 min.
  7. Remove and place in serving bowl.
Notes
  1. *Recipe from Kushi Institute Macrobiotic Leadership Program - Level 1
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Tempeh Reuben

Tempeh Reuben
Tempeh Reuben
Serves 4
Pickles and all, this is a wonderfully satisfying sandwich! A real winner!
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Ingredients
  1. ¼ cup Apple cider vinegar
  2. ¼ tsp sea salt
  3. ¼ cup rice syrup
  4. 2 Tbsp shoyu
  5. 1 tsp Dijon style mustard
  6. ¼ cup olive oil for marinade plus 1 Tbsp for sautéing onions
  7. 2 lbs tempeh
  8. 3 large onions – cut in thin half moons
  9. 1 tsp caraway seeds
  10. 2 cups sauerkraut – drained
  11. course-grain mustard to taste
  12. extra virgin olive oil to taste - for mustard sauce
  13. rice syrup to taste
  14. dill pickles
  15. whole grain sourdough sliced bread
Instructions
  1. Combine and whisk marinade ingredients in a bowl: vinegar, salt, rice syrup, shoyu, Dijon mustard, olive oil
  2. Cut the tempeh in bread-size pieces and again in half-widths.
  3. Pour marinade over tempeh and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes.
  4. Bake tempeh in pre-heated oven at 350F for about 30 minutes, turning 1-2 times during the cooking.
  5. Sauté the onions with olive oil until sweet and translucent.
  6. Add the caraway seeds and sauerkraut and a little water.
  7. Cover and simmer on medium low heat for about an hour.
  8. Remove the lid and cook away any excess liquid.
  9. Prepare the mustard sauce: whisk good quality course-grain mustard with a little extra virgin olive oil and rice syrup to taste
  10. Slice dill pickles so that they will lay flat on sandwiches
  11. Steam sliced sourdough bread until heated through
Notes
  1. For a tasty delight, layer your sandwich as follows: bread followed by sliced pickles followed by tempeh then sautéed onions & kraut and drizzled with mustard sauce.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Berry Cobbler

Berry Cobbler
Berry Cobbler
A great way to enjoy melon when the weather is turning cold and cold raw fruit is no longer appealing.
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FILLING
  1. 1 cantaloupe melon – cut in medium small cubes
  2. 1 cup of fresh or frozen organic berries – I chose raspberries and cherries
  3. 1 cup apple or other sugar free juice
  4. Pinch sea salt
  5. 1 tsp vanilla extract
  6. 1 Tbsp kuzu root starch – diluted in ¼ cup cold juice
  7. Ingredients – topping
  8. ½ cup rolled oats – ground in food processor
  9. ½ cup whole wheat pastry flour or unbleached white
  10. ½ cup almonds – ground in food processor
  11. ½ cup pecans – ground in food processor
  12. ¼ cup neutral oil
  13. ½ - ¾ cup rice syrup
  14. Pinch sea salt
  15. 1 tsp non-aluminum baking powder
ALMOND CREAM
  1. 1 cup whole raw almonds – blanched and skins removed
  2. About 2 cups water
  3. 1 tsp vanilla extract
  4. Pinch sea salt
  5. Rice syrup to taste
Instructions
  1. 1. Simmer the melon with the juice and sea salt for about 15 minutes
  2. 2. Stir in the diluted kuzu and vanilla
  3. 3. Take off the stove and add the berries
  4. 4. Combine all topping ingredients and with a rubber spatula.
  5. 5. Pour fruit mixture into a baking dish and cover with the topping. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 375F for about 25 minutes or until topping is lightly browned and the juices from the fruits starts bubbling through.
  6. 6. In a good blender (preferably a Vitamix), blend almonds with enough water to achieve a smooth consistency. Don’t worry if it seems watery - when you cook it, the almond cream will thicken up.
  7. 7. Once the almond cream is smooth, bring to a simmer over medium heat in a thick bottomed sauce pan. Careful not to burn.
  8. 8. Add the salt and vanilla simmer for about 10 minutes.
  9. 9. Remove from heat and sweeten with rice syrup according to your taste.
  10. Serve cobbler warm or at room temperature with almond cream…. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone’s Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success.
  2. *http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Kimchi Pressed Salad / Kimchi Pickle

Kimchi Pressed Salad / Kimchi Pickle
Kimchi Pressed Salad / Kimchi Pickle
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
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Salad
  1. • 1 medium size head Chinese cabbage (2lbs) – remove any wilted out leaves, rinse and then cut the cabbage in half from top to bottom, remove the core and slice both halves of the cabbage ½ inch thick pieces
  2. • 1 medium size ½ lb daikon – cut in matchsticks
  3. • 1-2 ribs celery – cut in half lengthwise and slice in thin diagonals
  4. • 1-2 carrots – cut in fine matchsticks
  5. • 1/3 cup scallions – cut in half lengthwise and then in 1 inch pieces
  6. • 1 tsp ginger – peeled and finely grated
  7. • 1- 2 tsp garlic – peeled and finely grated (Optional)
  8. • ¼ cup course or fine sea salt
  9. • 1 tsp – 1 Tbsp Korean chili flakes
  10. • 2 tsp rice syrup
  11. • Few turns fresh black pepper
Dressing
  1. • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  2. • 2 tsp rice syrup
  3. • 1 tsp shoyu
Instructions
  1. 1. Combine all the vegetables
  2. 2. Add the seasonings and work well into vegetables
  3. 3. Taste and adjust seasoning, the mixture should taste lightly salty and have a good flavor
  4. 4. Place in a salad press or use a plate and a weight press your salad
  5. 5. Leave for 1-2 hours, take out desired amount, gently squeeze, whisk dressing ingredients and serve with dressing or as is, enjoy!
Tips
  1. If you continue to press the kimchi make sure when you check it that your hands are clean and dry.
  2. A porcelain ginger grater works great, if you don’t have one peel the ginger and cut in thin slices, then into fine match sticks and then finely mince.
  3. When you are ready to eat your salad or kimchi pickle if it is too salty rinse briefly in a strainer and squeeze out excess water.
  4. Korean chili powder can be purchased in an Asian Market, it is an essential ingredient in Korean cuisine, gochugaru (or kochukaru) is a coarsely ground red pepper with a texture between flakes and powder. Traditionally, gochugaru is made from sun-dried chile peppers, and versions that are prepared in this manner are still considered the best tasting. The flavor is hot, sweet, and slightly smoky. You can use chili flakes or cayenne powder but the taste just isn’t the same!
  5. If you don’t have a salad press and you are pressing your salad in a bowl with a plate and a weight on top then be sure to cover with a clean kitchen towel.
Notes
  1. The leftover salad can be eaten as is or turned into a kimchi pickle, simply continue to press the salad on your counter top for 1-5 days, taste daily and when you want the fermentation process to stop simply refrigerate
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Sesame Amazake Blueberry Tart

Sesame Amazake Blueberry Tart
Recipe developed by Chef Simone Parris. For more information on Chef Simone, please view her website Simone's Kitchen* – Simone creates natural gourmet cuisine for health, happiness and success. *http://www.simoneskitchen.com/aboutsimone.htm
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BASE LAYER
  1. • ½ cup white sesame seeds – washed and dry toasted in a skillet, set aside
  2. • ½ cup rolled outs – lightly ground in food processor
  3. • Pinch sea salt
  4. • 1-2 Tbsp untoasted sesame oil
  5. • 2-3 Tbsp rice syrup
  6. • 1 tsp zest of organic orange
AMAZAKE LAYER
  1. • 2 cups amazake
  2. • 1 heaping Tbsp agar flakes
  3. • 2 tsp kuzu root starch – diluted in ¼ cup cold water
  4. • 1 tsp zest of organic lemon
  5. • Pinch sea salt
BLUEBERRY LAYER
  1. • 2 cup apple juice
  2. • 3 Tbsp agar
  3. • 2 cups fresh or frozen organic blueberries
  4. • 2 tsp kuzu root starch diluted in ¼ cup apple juice
  5. • Pinch of sea salt
  6. • 1 tsp lemon juice
  7. • 1-2 Tbsp rice syrup
Instructions
  1. 1. Pre-heat oven to 350F
  2. 2. Combine BASE ingredients, cut a circle of baking paper to fit the bottom of your 8 or 9 inch spring form cake pan
  3. 3. Press the mixture evenly over the bottom of the cake pan
  4. 4. Bake for 15-20 minutes, remove from oven and allow to cool
  5. 5. In a thick bottomed sauce pan heat the amazake with the agar and sea salt, turn down to simmer and simmer gently until agar is completely dissolved
  6. 6. Whisk the amazake while you stir in the diluted kudzu
  7. 7. Stir in the lemon zest, simmer another minute and set aside
  8. 8. In a thick bottomed sauce pan heat the 2 cups apple juice with the agar and sea salt
  9. 9. Allow to simmer until the agar has completely dissolved
  10. 10. Whisk the juice while you stir in the diluted kudzu
  11. 11. Add the blueberries and lemon juice and sweeten with rice syrup to taste
  12. 12. Once the sesame layer of your tart is cooled pour in the amazake and spread evenly, refrigerate until cool and firm.
  13. 13. Once the amazake layer is firm, layer with the blueberry juice mixture, refrigerate until you are ready to serve.
  14. Tip: the sesame layer is a little sticky, so it is better to remove the tart completely from the spring form pan to a cutting board where you can cut it properly and remove it from the baking paper.
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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Understanding Diabetes by Edward Esko

According to estimates, diabetes is positioned to become the leading public health epidemic of the 21st century. Worldwide, the incidence of diabetes has increased dramatically. Diabetes is expected to affect 350 million people by 2030, doubling from the 2000 level of 170 million. The greatest increase is expected to occur in the developing countries of Asia, Africa, and the Persian Gulf.

In the United States, the number of people with diabetes jumped from 5.6 million in 1980 to 20.9 million in 2010. Close to 27% of persons over age 65 now have diabetes. One in three Americans are predicted to develop diabetes by mid-century. The cost of treating diabetes in the U.S. will soon approach $200 billion per year. Diabetes threatens to overwhelm health care systems in this country and around the world. Diabetes is a major factor in the ongoing financial crisis caused by skyrocketing health care costs.

Modern medicine remains powerless in the face of this planet-wide surge. In a special 200th anniversary article in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM 2012; 367-1332/October 4, 2012) entitled “The Past 200 Years in Diabetes,” Dr. Kenneth Polonsky states: “…The pathway to cure has remained elusive. In fact, if one views diabetes from a public health and overall societal standpoint, little progress has been made toward conquering the disease during the past 200 years, and we are arguably worse off now than we were in 1812.”

Could it be that after billions in research and decades of effort, we are worse off now than we were two centuries years ago? Perhaps it is time to take stock and reassess. Perhaps a fresh approach is called for. Let us now examine diabetes from the macrobiotic perspective, beginning with the role of the pancreas.

The Role of the Pancreas
The pancreas is a flat shaped organ located on the left side of the body below the stomach. In its structure, function, and energy it is complementary to the liver, the large organ located opposite it on the right side. The pancreas, being lower in position and more flat than the liver, is classified as yang. The liver, being larger and more expanded, is comparatively yin. (Yang is the term used to describe smaller or more compact forms; yin is the term used to describe larger, more expanded forms.)

The pancreas is animated primarily by celestial force flowing down toward earth. This more yang force is stronger on the left side of the body. The descending colon is evidence of its influence. The liver, on the other hand, receives stronger upward energy. This more yin force originates with the rotation of the earth and is stronger on the right side of the body. Hence the ascending colon is located on the right. The primary forces of yin and yang create the organs and animate their respective functions.

This classification is essential and relevant to our understanding of the cause of diabetes as well as to the prevention and recovery from this disease.

Looking at the way in which these organs interact to regulate the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood will help illustrate this further. The metabolic sugar cycle is divided into stages:

1. Eating food
2. Digesting, or breaking carbohydrate down into glucose (simple sugar)
3. Glucose entering the blood
4. Pancreas releasing insulin
5. Glucose exiting blood and entering body cells.

The processes of eating, digestion, and the absorption of glucose by the bloodstream represent the yin or expansive phase of the cycle. Chewing and digestion are processes of breakdown and decomposition, in this case, breaking down more complex carbohydrates into simple sugar known as glucose. The release of insulin by the pancreas and the entrance of glucose into the cells are the yang or contractive phases in the cycle. The net result of the yin phase is a rise in blood glucose (sugar), while the result of the yang phase is a decrease in blood glucose. High blood sugar is yin, while low blood sugar is yang.

The pancreas performs a dual function. The acini cells secrete digestive enzymes, similar to saliva. On the whole, pancreatic digestive juice is alkaline and yang. It especially aids in the digestion of fats, which are yin. Scattered throughout the pancreas are about a million cell clusters known as the “islets of Langerhans.” The islets are a compact collection of endocrine cells that secrete the hormones that regulate the conversion of sugar into energy and hence the level of sugar in the blood.

The two primary endocrine cells are known as alpha cells and beta cells. The smaller and denser beta cells secrete the yang hormone insulin, which lowers blood sugar. Alpha cells, which are larger and more expanded, secrete the yin hormone glucagon, which has the effect of raising the level of sugar in the blood. As we saw above, on the whole the pancreas is a yang organ. The pancreas contains far more beta cells than alpha cells. The ratio of beta cells to alpha cells is approximately 85% to 15%, or about seven parts beta to one part alpha.

Insulin and Glucagon
Insulin and glucagon offer a perfect example of complementary balance. When blood sugar becomes elevated, the beta cells secrete insulin. Insulin causes glucose to enter the body’s cells, thus lowering the blood sugar level. It also signals the liver to bind glucose molecules for storage in the form of glycogen. The net result is a decrease in blood glucose.

Conversely, when the glucose level becomes low, the alpha cells secrete glucagon. This yin hormone signals the liver to break stored glycogen (yang) down into free glucose (yin), thus raising blood sugar levels.
Insulin (yang) bonds with receptors on the cell membrane (yin).

The mechanism by which insulin facilitates the entry of glucose into the body’s cells can also be understood in terms of yin and yang. Cells consist of an outer cell membrane (yin) and an inner cell nucleus (yang.) Free glucose circulating in the blood is yin, while insulin, as we saw, is yang. Glucose is naturally repelled by the yin cell membrane; it needs a yang agent to facilitate transfer through the membrane and into the interior of the cell. This is accomplished by insulin. Insulin readily bonds with receptors on the cell membrane and passes through the membrane into the interior. The presence of insulin below the surface membrane changes the quality of the membrane. It now becomes yang and attracts and admits glucose.

What is Diabetes?
Diabetes occurs when the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin or when the body’s cells resist or reject the insulin that is produced. The result is high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, which produces a number of symptoms and side effects, both immediate and long term. In his article Dr. Polonsky describes the disease as follows:

“Over the past two centuries, we have learned that diabetes is a complex, heterogeneous disorder. Type 1 diabetes occurs predominantly in young people and is due to selective autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cell, leading to insulin deficiency. Type 2 diabetes is much more common, and the vast majority of people with this disorder are overweight. The increase in body weight in the general population, a result of high-fat, high-calorie diets and a sedentary lifestyle, is the most important factor associated with the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Older adults are most likely to have type 2 diabetes, although the age at onset has been falling in recent years. Type 2 diabetes is now common among teenagers and young adults.

“We now know that insulin resistance is essential in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and that the disease results from both insulin resistance and impaired beta cell function.”

Both insulin resistance and impaired beta cell function are yin conditions, as are obesity and overweight. A primary cause of these conditions is the intake of strongly yin simple sugars, such as refined sugar, as well as refined carbohydrates like white rice and white flour. The continual intake of these extremes exhausts and depletes the beta cells. The result is either not enough insulin or insulin that is too weak to facilitate the transfer of glucose across the cell membrane. If insulin lacks strong yang power, it will not be able to bond with the cell membrane and enter the interior of the cell. Without insulin as a facilitator, glucose does not enter the cell but remains circulating in the blood, hence the high level of blood glucose characteristic of diabetes. This mechanism explains the onset of type 2 diabetes.

The mechanism of type 1 diabetes is a little different, albeit also extremely yin. T. Colin Campbell, PhD in The China Study, best describes the process:

“This devastating, incurable disease strikes children, creating a painful and difficult experience for young families. What most people don’t know, though, is that there is strong evidence that this disease is linked to diet and, more specifically to dairy products. The ability of cow’s milk protein to initiate type 1 diabetes is well documented.”

As Dr. Campbell explains, in some infants, cow milk proteins are not fully digested and small amino acid chains or protein fragments are absorbed by the small intestine. In the bloodstream the immune system identifies these fragments as antigens, or foreign proteins, and codes antibodies to destroy them. Some of these protein fragments are identical in form to insulin-producing beta cells. Antibodies produced by the immune system thus destroy both the cow proteins and the beta cells, taking away the child’s ability to produce insulin. The result is type 1 diabetes, an incurable lifetime condition.

Once again, we can understand this process in terms of yin and yang. Milk, a product of the yang animal body, is a powerfully yin secretion designed for growth. This is especially true for the milk of large mammals such as a cows. The intake of this strongly yin substance (often together with refined sugar) is largely responsible for the onset of type 1 diabetes.

Good Carbs vs. Bad Carbs
Carbohydrates come in two types: “simple” or “complex.” Simple carbohydrates contain just one sugar molecule (monosaccharide) or two sugar molecules (disaccharide.) Simple sugars demonstrate strong expansive force. These yin molecules enter the bloodstream very quickly. They cause a rapid spike in blood sugar. In contrast, complex carbohydrates consist of a chain of sugar molecules linked together. Their strong bonding force is yang. The body has to work harder to break down the links in the chain; hence they enter the bloodstream more slowly than simple sugars. The level of sugar in the blood remains more constant and steady. This distinction is crucial in understanding the effect of diet on diabetes.

Examples of simple carbohydrates include table sugar, honey, fruit, fruit juice, jam, and chocolate. They are often labeled “bad” because they are high in calories compared to their nutritional content and because of their effect on blood sugar. Complex carbohydrates are lower in net calories and are sometimes touted as “healthy carbs.” They include foods like whole grains, beans, whole grain bread and pasta, vegetables, especially sweet-tasting ones, and sea vegetables.

Brown vs. White Rice
Brown rice contains beneficial fiber, minerals, vitamins, and phytochemicals like beta-carotene. Milling and polishing brown rice removes most of its vitamins and minerals. It also strips away most of the fiber in brown rice. The fiber in brown rice and other whole grains slows the absorption of glucose and helps prevent diabetes. That is because the carbohydrate in whole grain fibers is yang and cohesive. The body has to work harder to break the links that bind the carbohydrate chains together.

Although the starch in white rice, white flour, and a baked potato is in the form of complex carbohydrate, the body converts this starch into blood sugar almost as quickly as it processes pure glucose. These foods cause a rapid rise in blood sugar and are classified as having a high glycemic index. The glycemic index classifies foods on how quickly and how high they raise the level of sugar in the blood in comparison to pure glucose.

As we have seen, a food like brown rice is digested more slowly. It doesn’t cause a rapid spike in blood sugar and is classified as having a low glycemic index. When brown rice is milled and refined by removing its bran and germ, its glycemic index rises. The same is true of whole wheat and other grains. Finely ground grain (yin or expansive) is more rapidly digested than coarsely ground grain (more contractive or yang), and has a higher glycemic index. The type of starch is also a factor in determining a food’s glycemic index. More yin starches, like those in potatoes, are rapidly digested and absorbed. Potatoes have a high glycemic index. More yang starches, like those in brown rice, are processed more slowly and have a low glycemic index.

Because of these factors, brown rice is being touted as a possible solution to the diabetes epidemic, especially in China and other rapidly developing countries. A January 2012 article from the Harvard School of Public Health entitled, “Can Brown Rice Slow the Spread of Type 2 Diabetes?” states:

“The worldwide spike in type 2 diabetes in recent decades has paralleled a shift in diets away from staple foods rich in whole grains to highly refined carbohydrates, such as white rice and refined flours. Now a group of researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) aims to stem the tide by changing the color of the world’s rice bowl from white to more-nutritious brown.”

The announcement of a collaborative initiative to prevent the global diabetes epidemic by improving the quality of carbohydrate consumed follows an earlier study published on June 14, 2010 on the website of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine. In the study, HSPH researchers found that eating five or more servings of white rice per week was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, while a diet that includes two or more servings of brown rice was associated with a lower risk. The investigators estimated that the risk of type 2 diabetes could be lowered by 16% by replacing 50 grams of white rice (1/3rd of a typical daily serving) with the same amount of brown rice. Interestingly, replacing the same amount of white rice with whole wheat or barley was associated with a 36% lower risk.

“From a public health point of view, whole grains, rather than refined carbohydrates, such as white rice should be recommended as the primary source of carbohydrates for the U.S. population,” said senior researcher Frank Hu. “These findings could have even greater implications for Asian and other populations in which rice is a staple food.”

The Potential of Macrobiotics
Macrobiotic educators have for decades advocated an approach similar to the approach advocated by the Harvard School of Public Health. The macrobiotic diet may offer the most effective approach to the prevention of diabetes. Macrobiotics advocates avoiding milk and dairy products associated with type 1 diabetes. Human breast-milk is preferred for infants. Refined sugar and artificial sweeteners like high fructose corn syrup are not recommended. Macrobiotics recommends avoiding or reducing foods such as potatoes, white flour, white rice, and others with a high glycemic index. Instead, foods rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber like whole grains, beans, fresh vegetables, and sea vegetables are the foundation of the macrobiotic diet. These foods are associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Moreover, the macrobiotic diet may prove an effective tool in the management of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, successful management and recovery have been noted in persons adopting a macrobiotic way of eating. Persons with type 2 diabetes have experienced a marked reduction in the need for medication; some after only one or two weeks after beginning the diet. Some patients have eliminated the need for medication entirely while noting marked improvements in overall health. At the very least, macrobiotics is acknowledged as an effective tool in weight loss and weight management. Patients with type 1 diabetes have noted reductions in the need for insulin and a lessening of complications after adopting a plant-based macrobiotic way of eating. Macrobiotics can help these patients better manage their condition.

With the mounting evidence linking diet with the cause, prevention, management, and potential recovery from diabetes, the time has come for clinical trials of the macrobiotic approach. Macrobiotics could very well offer a solution to this 21st century epidemic.

The article is from Rice Field Essays by Edward Esko, Amberwaves Press, 2014.

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Bettina’s Blueberry Tart

Blueberry Tart with Cashew Cream
Serves 6
Bettina Zumdick, Kushi Institute teacher and counselor, has been involved in Macrobiotics for over twenty-five years. A native of the Baltic Sea area in Germany, she studied food science at the University of Muenster. Bettina has taught Macrobiotics and other mind-body-spirit related topics such as meditation, Tao Yin Yoga and chanting throughout Europe and the United States. Enjoy this refreshing dessert courtesy of Bettina. Learn more about Bettina at http://www.bettinazumdick.com/.
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Crust
  1. 1 ¾ cup whole wheat pastry flour
  2. 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
  3. ¼ cup sunflower seed oil
  4. ½ cup maple syrup
  5. ½ teaspoon baking soda
  6. ½ teaspoon almond extract
  7. ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
Filling
  1. 2 cups organic apple juice
  2. pinch of salt
  3. 1 tablespoon agar flakes
  4. 1 tablespoon kuzu, diluted in 2 tablespoons of water
  5. ¼ cup rice syrup or maple syrup
  6. ½ pint fresh blueberries (or other seasonal berries like strawberries, raspberries or pitted cherries)
  7. fresh mint leaves for garnish
For the Crust
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Farenheit.
  2. Lightly oil a tart pan or line with parchment paper.
  3. In separate bowls, mix dry ingredients and wet ingredients. Next, gently whisk the wet ingredients into the dry mixture until the dough forms a ball. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough out to approximately 1/8 inch thickness. Transfer the dough into the tart pan, cutting off excess dough around the edges. Bake for 5 to 12 minutes or until the dough is golden brown. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool.
For the Filling
  1. Place apple juice, salt, agar flakes and rice syrup in a saucepan. Turn on heat and bring to a boil. Stir occasionally and boil until agar flakes are dissolved. Add diluted kuzu, stirring constantly to prevent lumping. Simmer until thickened. Stir in blueberries. Remove from heat and pour over pre-baked crust. Refrigerate to set filling. Garnish with mint leaves.
Find more dessert recipes in Bettina's book
  1. 10 Delicious Desserts for All Occasions
Adapted from 10 Delicious Desserts for All Occasions
Kushi Institute http://www.kushiinstitute.org/
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María José Colás Martínez Testimonial

IMG-20150407-WA0008Macrobiotic Leadership Program: Level I-IV Student Testimonial

María José Colás Martínez, April to July 2015

I first heard about Macrobiotics through my aunt. My aunt started to go to a Macrobiotic doctor in Spain. He studied macrobiotics with George Ohsawa (founder of Macrobiotics) and western medicine. He helped my aunt to stay in shape and have a successful pregnancy. She maintained her weight and had a lovely child.

In University, I studied chemical engineering. I started working in this field but always remembered the natural path that my aunt introduced me to. I worked for a cosmetics company, petrochemical company and also trading import and export from China and Spain. My job gave me the opportunity to live in China for two years. While in China, I became sick and couldn’t breathe very well. I went to see a Traditional Chinese Medicine doctor. This experience gave me great insight to more of what natural healing can do. After one week I was feeling perfectly fine.

Later on back in Spain, I was walking to my office one day and I felt that this was not theIMAG0260 right job for me and realized I needed to change my life. I wasn’t happy and knew I should be. I always wanted to do something related with the natural health field, so I decided to open an organic shop. My shop, Purusha, has been running for almost a year now. While working with my customers I realized I had a lack of knowledge around food and nutrition. I made an appointment with the doctor that had treated my aunt a long time ago. I wanted to learn for myself more about his Macrobiotic education. In the short time of meeting with him, he amazed and inspired me. He made me think that this is what I want to do with my life. Right away I started doing a bit of research and I found out the Kushi Institute (KI) in Becket, MA is where to get first hand information on macrobiotics. I set my goal to go study at the KI. My plan is to help people to live a better and more complete life through diet and lifestyle by following Macrobiotic principles. Amazing! Here I am studying at the KI and will complete the Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Levels I through III, and two weeks of the Level IV program. I hope to become the best counselor, chef and teacher that I can possibly be when I get back to Valencia, Spain.

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Tribute to Shizuko Yamamoto

By Patricio Garcia de Paredes

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I met Shizuko Yamamoto in the late 1970s in Spain. She had come to Barcelona to teach macrobiotics and shiatsu. My mother, Luisa Baranda, was one of the persons who organized her trip and she stayed at my house. In those days in Spain we still had not much contact with oriental culture and with people from Asia. So for her to stay in my house was both exiting and intriguing. Although I was just a kid at the time, her presence made a strong impression on me that I can still remember to this day. She was kind and considerate, yet strong and sharp. And in my view she embodied many of the qualities that I had created in my mind about what a person of wisdom and deep understanding of life from the far-east would be like. At the same time Shizuko was a very practical person and her unique down-to-earth style of teaching was very well received. She influenced many people’s lives and now in Spain and throughout Europe shiatsu has become very popular thanks to her pioneering work.

Among the most inspiring aspects about Shizuko was her own life story. She was a living example of how we can transform difficulties into possibilities and change suffering into happiness. Following World War II in Japan food was scarce and malnutrition widespread. To remedy the situation, the Allied occupation forces introduced milk and meat along with modern nutritional ideas about the importance of animal protein and calcium to develop strong, healthy bodies. It was believed at the time that the small size of the Japanese people was due to the nutritional inadequacy of the traditional Japanese diet, particularly lack of meat, milk and dairy products. Parents were encouraged to feed their children as much meat and milk as possible so that they would grow more big and strong. So while growing up Shizuko became an avid meat eater and she was even awarded as The Best Grown Child in her elementary school. However, that way of eating weakened her health and at the age of 21 she was diagnosed with leukemia. She also had vision and eye problems and went through 10 operations to correct her eyesight. She spent 3 years in and out of hospitals. After the hospital trauma, she stayed at home, almost hiding out from social activities for more than eight years. At one point she became determined to change her life and regain her health, so she began to look for alternatives.

While living with her parents in Tokyo, Shizuko was introduced to shiatsu (Japanese style of finger-pressure massage). There was an older woman, a shiatsu practitioner, who came to her home to give her parents shiatsu treatments. Originally she was not attracted to shiatsu and rejected the idea of other oriental healing arts. In those days in Japan people were educated to follow the western ways and shiatsu was looked upon as something backwards and unscientific. As a result many of the traditional cultural and healing arts were banned and just a few licensed practitioners were permitted to treat with shiatsu and only when they practiced within private homes. However, besides her eye problems, she also experienced pain on her neck and stiff shoulders, so she decided to receive shiatsu. And because it felt good and relived her pain, she began to study and practice various oriental ways of developing health and achieving well-being.

The first step began by reading a book on yoga and attending yoga classes which triggered other changes in her way of life. She also learned about macrobiotics and began to make dietary changes by centering her way of eating on brown rice, local vegetables, beans and bean products, sea vegetables and other plant foods and stopped eating meat and sugar. Every day she exercised a lot, went for walks and began to meditate. She would open the windows, let fresh air in and practice breathing exercises. Practically her whole life went through a whole transformation and within one month she already began feeling much better.

As time passed and her health recovered she felt drawn to begin helping other people. This sympathetic feeling towards helping others has been the foundation and driving force of what eventually would become her dream and life work. She first began to teach yoga and other corrective exercises at a training center. As she worked with people she realized that although the problems differed and the symptoms appeared to be different, they all shared the same origin. For example everyone followed unbalanced ways of eating and did not know how to move or breathe correctly. So everyone would get better by improving dietary habits and correcting breathing and movement exercises. This proved to her that if you make dietary changes and lifestyle adjustments you can get good results to strengthen and possibly recover health. For those students that would need extra help, she would she would give them shiatsu. She also started to try new techniques and began to use not just her hands and fingers to apply pressure but also her feet which later developed and evolved into a new style of barefoot shiatsu. In addition she also found out that yoga was very useful combined with shiatsu.

While helping people, she continued to study and integrate other natural and traditional healing and self-development arts including seitai (a system of guided self-corrective exercises), reiki (a form of palm healing), acupuncture, and aikido, many of which had been driven underground. Through her own experience and by integrating many different techniques and approaches, eventually she began to develop her own, original way of helping people. This included a well-balanced macrobiotic way of eating coupled with corrective exercises and shiatsu, which were to become the three main pillars of her unique approach to help individuals regain better health and alleviate their suffering. She then went on to develop a holistic beauty school where people could learn about macrobiotics, cooking, yoga and other corrective exercises, receive shiatsu and develop natural physical and mental beauty from within.

George and Lima Ohsawa

George and Lima Ohsawa

During those years, Shizuko had been studying macrobiotics with George and Lima Ohsawa, the founders and main proponents of modern macrobiotics. In 1965, after returning from a trip around the world, George Ohsawa called Shizuko and suggested to her to go to the United States to help spread macrobiotics in the west. At the beginning she hesitated because she had just started her holistic beauty school. But George continued to encourage her and after some consideration, she decided to take the challenge. She began to work on her visa with the help of Michio Kushi who was her sponsor in the United States and selling all her clothes and everything she owned to raise money. While Shizuko was making preparations of what would be an epic journey, in a curious twist of fate both her mother and her mentor George Ohsawa passed away. At Ohsawa’s funeral his friend Morihei Ueshiba, the creator of aikido as its known today, encouraged her in her journey to the West.

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Morihei Ueshiba

Arriving in America in 1966, Shizuko went to work initially as a private macrobiotic cook and guide to Hollywood movie star Gloria Swanson and her husband-to-be William Duffy. Swanson was the first actress to utilize her fame to campaign against crop spraying back in the 1920s. Both Swanson and Duffy were very influential promoting dietary changes in a more natural, healthy macrobiotic orientation. Duffy wrote Sugar Blues and Lady Sings the Blues, two controversial books that contributed to raise awareness about the harmfulness of sugar. Later she worked in a macrobiotic restaurant. While working at the restaurant some employees would complain about stiff neck and shoulders and she would work on them for a few minutes. Eventually by word of the mouth she began to make a living from giving shiatsu.

 eu a aprender com Shizuko Yamamoto 1986 Kiental Sui--at_shizuko_6_329Little by little Shizuko was invited to give talks on Eastern traditional healing methods and demonstrate techniques. She also met with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, who came to learn for years to learn about macrobiotics and also to receive treatments. Yoko and John introduced Shizuko to many influential people in New York, including John Cage, the dancer Merce Cunningham, actors Irma Paule and Mary Steenburg, Ted Danson and many senators. With a little help from her friends and clients along with some donations, she was able to establish the Macrobiotic Center of New York on a shoestring and was the president from 1970 to 1990. She would work seven days a week teaching, counseling and sometimes treating ten people a day. Since many Americans had large bodies with stiff muscles due to eating more meat and animal food, she began to use more her feet and elbows in addition to her hands. She would also teach at Michio and Aveline Kushi’s house in Boston and later at the Kushi Institute to many students.

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(L to R) Shizuko Yamamoto, Aveline Kushi, Michio Kushi, William Duffy and Cecile Levin

Shizuko Yamamoto gave seminars and workshops throughout the United States, Europe, Cuba, and her native Japan. Her influential work has inspired countless individuals around the world. And she has personally counseled, treated and guided thousands of individuals towards better health and happiness, including many celebrities and influential people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock. She is recognized as one of the pioneer shiatsu teachers in the West and leading shiatsu practitioners in the world. She was the creator of Barefoot Shiatsu and Macrobiotic Shiatsu styles. To further world-wide communication in the natural healing field, she initiated the International Macrobiotic Shiatsu Society. She has authored several books including Barefoot Shiatsu, The Shiatsu Handbook, 20-Minute Shiatsu, and Whole Health Shiatsu. Her books have been translated into seven languages. In Shizuko’s words she concludes simply by saying that: “The essence of shiatsu is love, which is infinitely available.”

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She was also an accomplished macrobiotic cooking instructor and has lectured and written widely on the importance of a natural, balanced way of eating for personal as well as for family health. Commenting on macrobiotics, she mentioned that “As long as you are determined to change your life, the practice of macrobiotics itself is easy and fun.”

Shizuko Yamamoto taught that to fundamentally change for the better we must learn from nature and develop a way of life in harmony with nature. She often would say that “We are one with nature,” based on the oriental concept of “shin-do-fuji.” Throughout her life she promoted organic foods and sustainable farming. She also realized through her own experience that in order to create a better world we need to begin by changing ourselves from within. By improving our health and looking at life in a positive way. This then would influence our family and reverberate in society. Now shiatsu and macrobiotics continues to grow and is sought after by many people around the world. Shizuko continued to teach, guide people and spread her message until late in her eighties even after losing most of her vision. She will be remembered by many as an outstanding teacher and a compassionate person who tirelessly dedicated her life toward helping other fellow human beings. May her life work be a source of inspiration to us all and her dream continue to influence humanity for many generations to come.

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 0089Patricio Garcia de Paredes

Patricio was introduced to macrobiotics at the age of five by his mother, Luisa Baranda, in his native Spain. After completing studies at the Kushi Institute, he began to give cooking classes and teach in Southeast Asia, South America, and Spain. In 1998 he moved to Japan and was executive chef at Kushi Garden and Chaya Macrobiotic Restaurant. Besides developing macrobiotic restaurants, he also maintained educational activities including giving cooking classes, presenting lectures, and publishing macrobiotic cookbooks. Presently he is the Education Director at the Kushi Institute of Japan. He currently resides in Japan with his wife, four daughters and one son.

 

 

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Christina Pirello’s Italian Nut Cookies

FullSizeRenderWe were so thrilled to have Christina and Robert Pirello join us at the Kushi Institute this Spring. Christina was a wonderful faculty addition to our Macrobiotic Leadership Program (we are looking forward to having her as guest faculty for a few days in September for Level 1). She also kicked off our 1st Saturday Seasonal Cooking with some very delicious recipes!

 

Christina Pirello’s Italian Nut Cookies with Chocolate Glaze
Makes about 24 cookies

2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
½ cup semolina flour
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch sea salt
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 stick Earth Balance baking sticks
½ cup brown rice syrup
3 tablespoons coconut sugar granules
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
½ cup coarsely chopped pecans
¼ cup coarsely chopped walnuts

chocolate glaze
¼ cup unsweetened almond or oat milk
3 tablespoons brown rice syrup
1 cup non-dairy, dark chocolate

Preheat oven to 350o and line a baking sheet with parchment.
Whisk together flour, semolina, cinnamon, salt, cocoa powder and baking powder and soda. Whip Earth Balance, syrup, coconut sugar and vanilla. Fold into flour mixture to form a soft, formable dough. Fold in nuts. Using moist hands, form dough into 1-inch spheres and arrange on baking sheet.

Bake until cookies are just firm, but still slightly soft, 18-20 minutes. Allow to cool for 2-3 minutes on baking sheet. Transfer to a wire rack and cool completely.

Make the glaze by placing almond milk and rice syrup in a small saucepan and bringing to a high boil. Pour over chocolate and whisk to form a smooth, satin-like glaze.

Slip a piece of parchment paper under the rack of cookies. Spoon glaze over each one, letting the glaze run over the sides. Allow to stand, undisturbed, until glaze begins to set. Transfer to a serving platter.  

Cook’s Tip: These cookies will keep, in a sealed container for several days.

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Yesenia Saad’s Fibromyalgia Recovery

photoI was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2011. I was struggling, feeling very fatigued. I had insomnia for many months and then became depressed. My body was sore 24/7 and I usually woke up tired, experiencing a lot of headaches and anxiety during the night.  Many people told me to start working out, but I already had a very active lifestyle. I went through 4 different anti-depressant treatments. I also took Xanax and Lyrica for the pain, but it didn’t help me. Experiencing Fibromyalgia caused me to stay in bed for about 4 to 6 months. This affected all of my relationships. At one point, I felt that cancer would be better than Fibromyalgia.
Two years after being on this medicine, I talked with one of my best friends, Salvatore Luccherino. At the time he had a Macrobiotic B&B in Portugal and currently is selling organic tempeh (http://www.salstempeh.com). Salvatore started talking to me about how the Macrobiotic diet could help with Fibromyalgia. I felt so inspired after talking with him that I booked a ticket to Portugal to learn from him in person. I stayed with Salvatore for 2 weeks while he cooked for me and showed me how to start eating a Macrobiotic diet.
While I was in Portugal, I had a macrobiotic consultation with Francisco Varatojo who owns a Macrobiotic center in Portugal, (http://www.institutomacrobiotico.com). Francisco saw that my consumption of animal products was very high and recommended that I adjust my diet. After only 2 weeks of eating a macrobiotic diet, my body started to react in a positive way. My energy returned. I finally started smiling again and felt like I was my healthy self again. I was happy, living without pain and sleeping perfectly. After 4 months, I stopped taking all of my medicine for Fibromyalgia . It has now been 2 ½ years since practicing Macrobiotics and after seeing all of the positive changes in my body, I decided to open a wellness center. I now help people and plan to continue to spread the incredible benefits of Macrobiotics.

I attended the Healthy Weight Loss Program in March 2014 to get introduced to the Kushi Institute. I have come back to take the Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1. I will be graduating next Friday from the program and will return to finish Level 2, 3 and 4 to further develop my skills. My goal and dream is to open up a healing center in Miami, Florida.

I believe everything happens for a reason, I wasn’t expecting to be ill, but I know from my recovery experience that I can help others with Fibromyalgia and other conditions from all that I’ve learned.

Please feel to contact me directly to learn more about my story at yesysaad@gmail.com.

Attended the Following Kushi Institute Programs:
Healthy Weight Loss 3/30/2014
Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1 3/29 – 4/25, 2015

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Gwen Burton’s Harvest Romance…

Macrobiotic Leadership Program

Spotlight: Gwen Burton, Current Level 3 Student

Gwen Burton is a champion of home-cooking, healthy food, and eco-friendly living. As the creator and publisher of Brown Rice Magazine, she has worked to make macrobiotic and plant-based cuisine appealing, relevant, and fun for the modern urban dweller. Gwen embodies and lives the values that she shares with her readers: synchronicity with the natural world, practicing devotion and concentration at every opportunity, and finding humor and beauty in all aspects of life. She draws on her five years of macrobiotic practice, as well as her education from the Kushi Institute and the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in order to help clients feel their best, realize their dreams, and maximize their potential to see them through. Gwen tutors individuals to hone their healthy home cooking, coaches clients to achieve wellness and peace in all aspects of life, performs private chef services, and regularly offers group workshops on fermentation throughout NYC. www.gwenburton.com

Click here to check out Gwen Burton’s Harvest Romance Yoga Pose Tutorial and begin harvesting some love in your life!

 

 

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Bringing It Home… Summer Conference

Bringing It Home: Kushi Institute Summer Conference By Alex Jack
Photos by Sachi Kato

The 2014 Macrobiotic Summer Conference exceeded everyone’s expectations. For the first time we held it on our spacious 600-acre campus here in the beautiful Berkshires. Over the course of two weeks in August, over 200 guests ate delicious daily meals (featuring vegan and gluten-free options) under a big tent and attended lectures by Michio Kushi and macrobiotic teachers, cooks, and practitioners from around the world. Gourmet chefs Eric Lechasseur and Sanae Suzuki prepared a special Gala fundraising dinner on August 15, and people danced and celebrated under the stars. Participants also enjoyed the outstanding cultural attractions of the Berkshires, including the Tanglewood Music Festival, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, and the Norman Rockwell Museum.

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Lunchtime in the tent.

The annual Aveline Kushi Awards were presented at the Summer Conference. The Aveline Award Ceremony took place at the lovely Aveline Memorial Peace Park located at the K.I. campus. Each year, the Aveline Award is presented for excellence in macrobiotic education, innovation, and service. This year’s awardees included macrobiotic senior teacher and artist Rod House (who turned eighty this year), new energy pioneers Woody and Florence Johnson, and the founder of Berkshire Mountain Bakery, Richard Bourdon.

A Macrobiotic Summer Tradition

The Macrobiotic Summer Conference has a long and storied history. In the U.S. summer conferences and camps go back to the introduction of macrobiotic education. Descended from the “New Horizon” macrobiotic summer camps held on Long Island and in the Catskills of upstate New York, the modern summer conference began in 1975 with the Amherst Summer Program held at Amherst College in Amherst Massachusetts. The first macrobiotic summer camps in the United States took place in the early ‘60s and featured lectures and classes with George and Lima Ohsawa. From that beginning, Herman and Cornellia Aihara continued the summer camp tradition in California at French Meadows from the 1970s onward, while on the East Coast, Michio and Aveline Kushi began the annual summer program at Amherst. Herman and Cornellia organized their annual summer camps as GOMF events, while the Amherst Summer Program was administered through the non-profit East West Foundation.

 The Amherst Summer Program (referred to in the macrobiotic community simply as “Amherst”) showcased the world’s leading senior macrobiotic teachers, including Michio and Aveline, Lima Ohsawa, Herman and Cornellia, Shizuko Yamamoto, and Hideo Ohmori, as well as the next generation including Lino Stanchich, Rod House, Cecil Levin, Murray Snyder, Evan Root, Bill Tara, Ron Kotsch, Marc Van Cauwenberghe, Jack Garvey, Denny Waxman, Bob Carr, Michael Rossoff, David and Cynthia Briscoe, Edward Esko, Wendy Esko, Diana Avoli, Adelbert and Weike Nelissen, Bill Spear, John Mann, and many others. Special guests and celebrities, including Bill Dufty and Gloria Swanson, also participated.

 Aside from the world-class educational program and lovely campus at Amherst College, the Amherst Program featured gourmet macrobiotic meals prepared by the staff of the Seventh Inn macrobiotic restaurant in Boston under the guidance of master chef, Hiroshi Hayashi. Hundreds of people from around the world attended the Amherst Program and considered it to be the high point of their yearly schedule.

 In the 1980s, the Amherst Program evolved into the annual Kushi Institute Summer Conference. The K.I. Conference adopted most of the features of the Amherst Program and expanded the roster of teachers even further. Over the years, the Summer Conference was held at a variety of venues in the New England and New York area, including Simon’s Rock College, Chimney Corners Camp, the University of Massachusetts, Westfield State University, and Babson College, all in Massachusetts, Bryant College in Rhode Island, Green Mountain College in Vermont, and more recently, the IBM Conference Center in New York and the Dolce Conference Center in New Jersey. For over three decades, thousands of people have participated in the Kushi Institute Macrobiotic Summer Conference, with teachers and attendees coming from around the world.

Exercise with Lino Stanchich.

 

Full Circle

The 2014 Conference was special in that it was the first time the Conference was held at the K.I. In order to accommodate guests, the Institute rented a spacious canopied tent. Participants stayed in the cozy Main House and North Hall dormitory. Off-campus accommodation was made available at area motels. Regular shuttle service aided participants with their transportation needs. Marisa Marinelli, a student of macrobiotics and event coordinator for the New York City Ballet, coordinated the 2014 Conference.

Lectures and cooking classes took place throughout the day, held in the K.I. Main House living room and kitchen and the North Hall library and chapel. The tent was reserved for meals, Michio Kushi lectures, and evening keynote presentations, as well as for the Gala dinner. In addition to K.I. Resident Faculty, Guest Faculty came in from all over the country and taught intensively for several days straight. Jane and Lino Stanchich came from North Carolina to teach, David and Cynthia Briscoe, Nadine Barner, and Larry Kushi came from California, Denny and Susan Waxman, Janet Lacey, and Robert and Christina Pirello came from Pennsylvania, Ginny Harper came from Tennessee, David Sergel came from Connecticut, Verne Varona and Susan Krieger came from New York, Gabrielle Kushi came from Minnesota, Dr. Henry Edward Altenberg came from Maine, and Larry and Judy Mackenny came from Florida. Phiya Kushi came from Alaska, as did many of the cooking staff. Michael Potter drove from Michigan to the Conference on his motorcycle!

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Cooking in the Main House with Christina Pirello.

A number of next generation K.I. guest teachers, including Angelica Kushi, Anthony Dissen, Carol Wasserman, Christine Waltermeyer, Marisa Marinelli, Flor Marques, and Daniel Esko, also gave classes. Patricio Garcia Parades, Director of Education at the Kushi Institute in Japan, journeyed from Tokyo via the Macrobiotic Summer Conference in Holland to present a series of international cooking workshops.

As a special feature, the K.I. held a “SuperLevel” course during the Conference. In addition to their regular leadership-training curriculum, participants in the K.I. Level 1 Program had the opportunity to attend Summer Conference events including evening keynote presentations by guest teachers together with Michio’s lectures.

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Delicious, macrobiotic meals served 3 times daily.

The response was uniformly positive and enthusiastic. The hardworking K.I. staff and resident and visiting teachers did an excellent job. We thank them and thank our sponsors, donors, and participants. Bob and Christina Pirello told us, “Don’t ever go back (to hotels and corporate conference centers.) Keep the Conference here at the K.I.!” Jane and Lino commented, “The 2014 Kushi Institute Summer Conference was like being in Macrobiotic Heaven! Delicious, balanced macrobiotic food was skillfully prepared and served in an airy tent where friends gathered with music, conversations, and laughter.” Gabrielle Kushi had this to say, “The 2014 Macrobiotic Summer Conference was like a breath of fresh air. The new venue provided chefs, teachers, volunteers, and students alike a chance to support each other on a totally new level, thus providing immense individual and community growth.” David and Cynthia Briscoe summed up the positive consensus by remarking, “What a refreshing experience! It was wonderful to have the grass beneath our feet; trees all around, fresh air, and to feel so relaxed on the KI grounds. It quickly became a family gathering, with plenty of time to make new friends and reconnect with old ones. The food, prepared by the passionate and creative K.I. chefs, was delicious.”

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Cynthia and David Briscoe.

Summer Conference 2015

From July 26 to August 9, 2015, the Macrobiotic Summer Conference will meet once again on the beautiful K.I. campus. We invite you to join us. We are now accepting registrations for this event. Participants can take either SuperLevel 1 and receive credit for our flagship Leadership Program featuring teacher, counselor, and chef training, or attend the Public Program with a plant-based smorgasbord of exciting lectures, cooking classes, and exercise workshops. You can enroll for 1-week or 2-week stays, weekends, or for the day.

Please register early to reserve your room, as campus housing is very limited and will sell out soon. K.I. shuttles will transport people staying off campus to selected Berkshire area motels. Call our registration office to register or for a list of participating motels and the special discounts they offer our participants. For more information call 413-623-5741 x102 and talk to Marisa Marinelli.

Alex Jack is the Executive Director of the Kushi Institute. He is the author of numerous books on macrobiotics, including, with Michio Kushi, The Cancer Prevention Diet, One Peaceful World, and The Macrobiotic Path to Total Health. The above article was published in Macrobiotics Today.

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Interview with K.I. Faculty Edward Esko

EdEskoBrown Rice Magazine Interview with K.I. Senior Faculty Edward Esko
By Gwen Burton

Brown Rice: When I think about the way that healthy eating has been adopted in our culture over the past few decades, I am struck by how macrobiotics seems to have been such a major player. I can see how it might be encouraging that healthy food options are proliferating and easily accessible, but also frustrating because people seem to believe they don’t have time to cook for themselves and many of these healthy food options employ the “fast food” model. What has it been like to participate in and witness the change in eating in the US over the decades? What is your opinion on where we are today?

EE: Many of the things macrobiotic teachers advocated in the 1960s and 1970s have now become mainstream. Let’s look at several core principles, starting with the concept of “fresh, local, and organic.” I first heard the idea of eating locally in Michio Kushi’s early lectures. Fresh, local, and seasonal foods were touted as the way to achieve sustainability, both in terms of personal health and our relationship to the environment. We went out of our way to support local organic growers and suppliers. We gave classes and published books such as “The Changing Seasons Macrobiotic Cookbook” that explained how to cook with the seasons.

Now, four star restaurants in Manhattan feature fresh, local, and organic produce. Seasonal cooking and shopping at farmer’s markets has become fashionable. Macrobiotics was way ahead of the curve on that.

Let’s take another core principle, the superiority of plant-based diets. When I first read George Ohsawa’s comment that the human body is perfectly equipped to process plant foods directly, without hiring middlemen such as cows or pigs, it made perfect sense. Also that a whole-grain- and vegetable-based diet has many advantages over an animal-based diet. A light bulb also went off when Ohsawa stated that cow’s milk was perfect food, for baby cows! I had been a big milk-drinker up to that time but hearing such common sense was a revelation. As with the other core macrobiotic principles, the notion that plant-based diets are superior has gained traction with leading-edge thinkers in nutrition and public health, including T. Colin Campbell, Neal Barnard, M.D., Dean Ornish, M.D., and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Another core principle that has become obvious today is the idea that whole foods are superior to refined and process foods. The term “whole foods” was actually invented by Michio’s inner circle in Cambridge around 1965. Now it has become part of the culture. Several years ago, the Harvard School of Public Health announced it would start promoting brown rice in place of white rice to stem the rise of diabetes in China. Brown rice is a whole food, white rice is a highly processed food.

Brown Rice: To what extent did the idea of “non-credo” shape the early macrobiotic movement, and do you think that this notion has been forgotten or passed over in the current era of health coaching and commercialized regimens? What is the role of non-credo in developing judgment?

EE: “Non-credo,” or “do not believe,” has always been at the center of macrobiotic philosophy. It always will. The only way to real self-knowledge is through your own practice and discovery. Macrobiotics is about freedom, pure and simple, not following someone else’s ideas.

Brown Rice: I’m curious about the tendencies of the long-term macrobiotic practitioner. Is it natural, in your experience, to want to self-experiment after having achieved a certain degree of mastery in the kitchen and with one’s own condition? It occurs to me that this tendency could either be a way of continuing one’s education in a way that could benefit others in the future, or might possibly be a manifestation of arrogance.

EE: The bottom line is that there is nothing other than self-experiment. It’s the nature of reality and not at all arrogance.

Brown Rice: What are your opinions on veganism? Macrobiotic diets include a small amount of white meat fish and some other seafood, but currently, attaining good-quality seafood is almost impossible. Now that I am vegan, I wonder about the ethical implications of causing the suffering and death of other beings, and I wonder why this might be acceptable according to macrobiotic philosophy, which otherwise seems concerned with facilitating peace on the entire planet through diet.

EE: Eating grains and vegetables means they have to die so that you live. The question is which types of foods make that sacrifice willingly and which resist. It seems to me animals are quite resistant to being killed and eaten as food for humans. Grains and vegetables seem quite willing to become human food. Similarly, billions of microscopic bacteria sacrifice themselves every time you enjoy miso soup, natto, or sauerkraut.

The Chinese character for peace, “Wa,” is made up of images for “cereal grain” and “mouth.” They apparently understood that eating grains and vegetables led to a peaceful mentality.

Brown Rice: There is an exciting project to grow rice in the Berkshires. Have these efforts been successful? I recently heard a rumor that at one point in time, macrobiotic founder George Ohsawa only ate rice immediately after it had been harvested. What does fresh rice taste like? Do you notice a big difference in taste and energy?

EE: Fresh harvest rice is for ceremonial purposes only, not for daily consumption. I’m sure Ohsawa enjoyed it on special occasions. We had the pleasure to enjoy freshly harvested rice from South River Miso on special occasions as well, such as Kushi Institute graduation ceremonies, my 60th birthday celebration, and others.

Check www.VermontRice.com for updates on rice growing in New England. Also look at www.SouthRiverMiso.com for rice growing and local production of miso in Western Mass.

Brown Rice: What is your diet like now? What kinds of foods are you attracted to after decades of macrobiotic practice?

EE: Onigiri (nori rice balls), soba (buckwheat noodles) in broth, natto (fermented soybean) rolls and melt-in-your-mouth salmon sashimi at Bizen, the Japanese macrobiotic restaurant in Great Barrington, Mass., vegan hummus sandwiches at Guido’s in Pittsfield, where I live, and water-sauteed green vegetables with brown rice vinegar or lemon.

Brown Rice: The Kushi Institute operates in MA. Are there any opportunities for NYC residents to learn more about the diet and the practice?

EE: My lectures in NYC offer an opportunity to experience Kushi Macrobiotic Education. Also, we would like to offer more extensive programs, such as Kushi Instititute (KI) Level One Certificate Programs in NYC beginning in the fall of 2014. Also, the Berkshires, where the KI is located, are not far from NYC. Just drive north up the lovely Taconic Parkway or the NY Throughway. We have a very special Summer Conference coming up in August that should be of interest to New Yorkers. Michio Kushi and more than twenty leading macrobiotic teachers will be presenting. The Conference will include vegan macrobiotic meals plus cultural events including the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Tanglewood Music Festival, the South River Miso rice field, and others. Go to KushiInstitute.org for ongoing updates.

The above interview was conducted by Gwen Burton and published in Brown Rice Magazine. Contact www.BrownRiceMagazine.com.

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In Honor of Michio Kushi

michio banner

Michio Kushi Tribute HI RES

Dear Friends,

We would like to honor Michio Kushi, macrobiotic educator, natural food pioneer and founder of Kushi Institute.  Michio passed away peacefully on December 28, surrounded by his loving wife Midori and sons Norio, Haruo, Phiya, and Hisao. He was 88 years old.  On behalf of the students, staff, and faculty of the Kushi Institute, we extend our heartfelt sympathy to the Kushi family.

Michio was actively involved in K.I. planning and development until just prior to his passing. His vision for the institute was to teach, guide, and inspire individuals towards greater personal freedom, health, and happiness.  The Kushi Institute plans to assure his teachings and mission will continue. 

Click for a more complete list of Michio Kushi’s achievements

As a result of the hard work and dedication of the K.I. staff, the support of our students and participants, and the generosity of our donors, the Institute ended 2014 on a very positive note. We have been successful in reaching the Institute’s goal of establishing the first Annual Fund and have raised sufficient funds contributing to general operating expenses. The work of K.I. counselors and teachers helped contribute to numerous success stories for individuals and families in their quest for better health and well being. 

The Institute’s core programs, the Macrobiotic Leadership Training Program and the Way to Health Program were well attended in 2014. The annual Kushi Institute Summer Conference, held for the first time in Becket MA, was a resounding success, and continues to bring in excitement as we plan for the upcoming 2015 event, July 26 thru August 9.  The K.I. also launched several exciting new programs designed to help those with specific conditions, including The Macrobiotic Approach to PsoriasisControlling Crohn’s and Colitis thru Diet, and The Natural Approach to Breast Cancer. We are now planning to introduce a variety of new workshops and seminars in 2015 to continue in this work. 

The K.I. also has ambitious plans for 2015 and beyond. In our last message, we introduced the Macrobiotic Breast Cancer Study. The Kushi Institute is now in discussion with medical researchers at Tufts University and Johns Hopkins University Medical School to begin the first ever randomized clinical trial on the effects of the macrobiotic diet on advanced cancer of the breast. Our hope is that the Macrobiotic Breast Cancer Study will revolutionize the treatment of this disease, so that a natural plant-based diet becomes a standard part of breast cancer treatment and recovery. The Institute has submitted a detailed proposal for a comprehensive macrobiotic care program for study participants. The K.I. hopes to complete the planning phase and move toward implementation this year. Please check kushiinstitute.org for ongoing developments.

To further Michio’s lifetime work of training a new generation of macrobiotic teachers, counselors, and chefs, the K.I. is planning to introduce the Macrobiotic Internship Program in 2015. Qualified participants will have the opportunity to assist K.I. counselors and teachers in personal counseling sessions, lectures, and cooking classes. More details will be announced on this program shortly.

We ask for your support in helping us continue Michio’s vision of health, peace, and sustainability through the macrobiotic way of life. You can support the K.I. by attending a program, recommending the K.I. to friends and family, purchasing high-quality foods and supplies from the Kushi Store, or making a tax-deductible donation the Kushi Institute Annual Fund. We’d like to thank those who have already contributed. It is with much appreciation and gratitude that we will continue the legacy and further the dream of one peaceful world.

On behalf of the staff, faculty, and students of the Kushi Institute, we wish you a healthy and happy New Year.

Alex Jack
Edward Esko 

Let us honor his wonderful life. We invite you to share below.

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Holiday Stuffed Squash

Holiday Stuffed Squash

Stuffed Squash

1 medium-sized blue Hubbard Squash or other hard winter squash of similar size
1 tbsp corn or sesame oil
1 cup onions, deiced
1 cup celery, diced
Pinch of sea salt
8 cups whole wheat or whole wheat sourdough bread cubes, slightly dried out or toasted in a dry skillet until golden brown
2 cups cooked seitan cubed
shoyu
1 1/2 – 2 cups seitan gravy

Carefully cut out a round section off the top of the squash, just as you would for a jack-o-lantern, and set it aside. Clean out all the seeds and set aside. Heal oil in a skillet and saute the onions for 1-2 minutes. Add the celery and a pinch of salt. Saute for 1 to 2 minutes more. Place this mixture in a large mixing bowl and add the dried or toasted bread cubes and seitan and mix well. Add a small amount of shoyu and mix again. Stuff the hollowed squash completely full. Pour the seitan gravy over the stuffing and let it seep down. Place the top back on the squash.  Oil the outside skin of the squash with a small amount of sesame oil. Place the stuffed squash on a baking tray or over roaster and bake at 325 F for about 2 hours. To test for doneness, use a shish kebob stick or chopstick to push the hard skin. When it goes through easily, it is done. Serve with seitan gravy after scooping out the stuffing and squash for each person.

Variation: use sauteed vegetables together with cooked brown rice and wild rice, kasha and vegetables, or millet and vegetables. Add sliced mushrooms, almonds or pine nuts to stuffing.

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The Holiday Hangover Helper

The Holiday Hangover Helper

The Winter holiday season brings potential hangover weather with it. To avoid the pitfalls of lethargy, depression, and nausea after those gatherings with family and loved ones, try a few macrobiotic tips!

1. Get out of the house and get some fresh air!

2. Exercise twenty-one minutes daily to alleviate the depression and raise the oxygen levels depleted by a lack of sleep and too much booze.

3. Bring on the carbohydrates!  One half a sourdough whole wheat bagel with tofu cream cheese and chives can lift the blood sugar that has usually tanked from too much ethanol.

4. Have miso soup and a few seaweed nori rolls to help the liver flush out a toxic molecule that gets created when the alcohol is broken down.

5. For dinner, eat a bowl of pasta with lentils, a touch of roasted garlic, chopped parsley, olive oil, and salt and pepper.  This will give the body the fuel it needs to push out all the toxic byproducts of alcohol metabolism.

6. To quell the nausea, eat 1/4 teaspoon of umeboshi paste.

7. Besides kukicha tea, the beverage of choice for people in usual good health under these circumstances would be green or black tea because they contain good-guy polyphenols, which enhance a quick recovery.  By adding (preferably organic) fresh ginger – peeled, sliced, pounded, chopped, and put into the tea to be eaten after its been drunk – you will only increase the benefits.

Salute!

Article courtesy of Elizabeth G. Karaman

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Korean Student’s Journey To Macrobiotics

Korean Student’s Journey To Macrobiotics

Meet Jiyoon Kim
Graduate of our Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Levels 1,2, and 3

I discovered macrobiotics 2 years ago. Before I found macrobiotics, I quit my very stressful job. I had been struggling with poor blood circulation, hypoglycemia, and had gained over 10 lbs. I began to feel I could no longer control my condition. These changes in my health were causing me concern because my fathers’ mother had passed away from diabetes. Also, my mother’s father and mother passed away very early from liver cancer and kidney disease respectively. Furthermore, my uncle and aunt are struggling with diabetes presently.

With above concerns, I deeply wanted a new healthy lifestyle for my family and myself. I began doing a lot of Internet research specifically related to cooking, food, and their connection with our health. During my search I was intrigued by a new term I came across, “macrobiotics”. I found the teachings to be rational even though I was not a vegan. I felt that macrobiotic philosophy was very well-founded, and the concepts and principles resonated with me greatly. Searching for further information, Kushi Institute was listed as the first resource for macrobiotic. This is where I would be spending three months of my life bringing myself back to harmony, and opening new experiences.

When I registered for Kushi Institute’s Macrobiotic Leadership program, I expected that I would only be learning about macrobiotic cooking. I was very pleasantly surprised. The learning was much more comprehensive. It included philosophy (the principles of yin and yang), history, shiatsu, and visual diagnosis. Since arriving at the Kushi Institute back in September, I feel so much lighter. My first week here, I lost almost 9 lbs! Moreover, I felt changes happening in my body, and experienced a lot of discharging from all of the bad foods I had been eating. I sense my health has improved immensely.

During the last couple of months I have been learning to balance my diet. I used to be addicted to sweet things. I craved a lot of sugar. After I read some books and learned about macrobiotics, I tried to keep away from sugar. I have successfully replaced standard sweeteners with acceptable macrobiotic substitutes, and I do not miss them! Immersing myself at the Kushi Institute, I acquired a deeper understanding of all the diverse macrobiotic concepts, and felt passionately that this could benefit the entire world. I would love to take part in spreading this wisdom all over the world.

In Korea, macrobiotic instructors are few and far between, and their focus is primarily on cooking. When I took macrobiotic cooking classes in Korea, I felt as though it was not enough. I felt I needed to learn the whole concept. I believe that Kushi Institute provided this missing gap. When I took a quick visit to South Korea 2 weeks ago, my mother was so happy! She looked at me and said, “You look much brighter and healthier.” This confirmed what I have been feeling, and further fueled my determination and practice. Her comments made me realize I am on the right path.

Before coming to Kushi Institute, I was planning to further pursue nutrition, food, and health. Now I want to make a bridge connecting these interests and macrobiotics. I am confident that it could benefit young and old alike to be more aware of their diet and lifestyle choices. For my next step, I’ve made the decision to attend graduate school for Public Health and Nutrition. After, making this decision, I experienced a wonderful feeling of satisfaction. I think this moment is the biggest turning point in my life.

 

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Fish Dumplings

Fish Dumplings

Fish Dumpling RecipeAlfred Liu

By Kushi Chef, Alfred Liu  

 

Ingredients for Filling

  • White Meat Fish (Haddock)
  • Nappa Cabbage
  • Shiitake
  • leeks
  • Ginger
  • Arrowroot powder
  • Sesame oil
  • Shoyu

Ingredients for Dough:

  • 1 ½ cups Spelt
  • 1 ½ cups Pastry Flour
  • Pinch of Salt
  • Luke Warm Water
  • Rolling stick to roll out the dough into proper size.

 

Directions to Prep Dough: (should be done first)

  1. Mix all ingredients together with a cup of water to mix thoroughly. Make sure constantly is easy to press and roll out. Not so soft or hard. Set aside.
  2. After 10 mins knit again. Leave in bowl with wet towel to cover so it does not dry out. Repeat this 3x kneading for 5-8 mins.

Directions to Prep Filling:

  1. Finely cut nappa cabbage and roughly hack. Pieces do not need to be perfect (approx. 4 cups). Add salt to press and massage. Let rest.
  1. Grate ginger (approx. 1 tsp). Finely chop leeks (about ¼ cup).
  1. Soak dried shiitake overnight and drain water (or fresh shiitake can be used). Finely chop and roughly hack similar to cabbage pieces.
  1. To prepare the fish, wash and cut into fillet slices and mince into meat size. The smaller the pieces the easier to pack into the dough. (approx. 2 cups).
  1. Add all filler ingredients in bowl with shoyu and sesame oil (roughly 4 tblsp). Make sure filling is moist. Add arrowroot to help bind mixture together (approx. 1 ½ tblsp).
  1. Let filling sit aside 5-10 minutes.

Directions to Prep Dumpling:

  1. Bring 3 quarts of Water to a boil.
  1. Cut dough so you can roll into long pretzel like. Cut the stipe of dough into 1-inch pieces. Press each piece to form round and roll out dough, with a rolling pin, into a flat circle.
  1. Fill the circle with your filling on one side and flip dough over to make a half circle. Pinch around the dough to seal, making a dumpling-like pinch.  
  1. Placed formed dumpling into boiling water for approx 3-4 mins. When it rises to the surfaces you know it’s ready. Scoop out, let drain.
  1. Take skillet pan and heat with sesame oil to make pan fried dumplings.

 

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EBOLA: The Macrobiotic Approach.

EBOLA: The Macrobiotic Approach.

Ume-Sho-Kuzu is the principal medicinal drink for enhancing natural immunity, strengthening the blood, and preventing or relieving infectious conditions, including Ebola. It is made with umeboshi plums, natural soy sauce (shoyu), and kuzu root powder simmered in hot water.

Ume-Sho-Kuzu Recipe:

1 tblsp of kuzu 
1/4-1/2 an umeboshi plum
few drops of shoyu
water

Dissolve the kuzu in about 3 tblsps of cold water in a small sauce pan.  Add another cup of water and the umeboshi plum and bring to a boil stirring constantly.  Stirring prevents the kuzu from clumping.  When it comes to a boil, simmer the flame and add a few drops of shoyu.  Drink while hot.


The energies of nature and the infinite universe are absorbed through the foods we eat and are transmuted into the thoughts, feelings, words, and deeds that spring from them. 

Article by Michio Kushi
with Alex Jack, Edward Esko, and Midori H. Kushi
and the Kushi Institute Research and Faculty Committee

  1. Introduction

 As the 21st century unfolds, there is a growing sense of impending collapse. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, AIDS, and other degeneration and infectious diseases are multiplying, The spread of nuclear weapons and energy, regional conflicts, and terrorism have resulted in widespread fear and uncertainty. Global warming, climate change, and the destruction of the natural environment pose serious threats to the continued survival of many species, including our own. New technologies have given us marvelous computers, cells phones, and other devices that have transformed our lives. But artificial electromagnetic radiation, the mining of rare earth metals and conflict minerals, and the rise of biotechnology entail unrecognized social and environmental costs that imperil personal and planetary health, and in the long run are unsustainable.

 Macrobiotics—the way of health and peace through biological and spiritual change and evolution—does not require special foods, supplements, drugs, vaccines, scans, or genetic engineering. Health and peace do not originate from any political party, religious movement, cultural tradition, or social platform. It begins in kitchens and pantries, gardens and backyards, where the primary physical source and vitality of our daily life—whole cereal grains, the staff of life, our daily bread—is produced and developed. From individual hearts and homes, peace radiates out to friends and neighbors, communities, nations, and eventually the world as a whole.

Whoever takes charge of the farming, cooking, and food production is our general, our pilot. We need no weapons, no shields, no offensive and defensive powers, just will and self-reflection. Brown rice, whole wheat, millet, and other whole grains; miso soup; vegetables from land and sea; beans and bean products; fruits, seeds and nuts; and other predominantly plant-based foods are our “weapons” to turn around the entire world. The energies of nature and the infinite universe are absorbed through the foods we eat and are transmuted into the thoughts, feelings, words, and deeds that spring from them. By becoming one with the infinite universe and nature and observing the universal laws of change and harmony—or what can be called the will of God—we are quite capable of restoring balance and order to our planet. Age old problems of war and peace, sickness and health, poverty and wealth, and all other polarities that divide people can be resolved through a balanced, natural way of eating; calm, peaceful mind; and grateful spirit.

Over the years, modern macrobiotics has spearheaded the organic, natural foods movement. It has pioneered dietary research with Harvard Medical School, the National Institutes of Health, and other health care institutions into the cause and prevention of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses. We have also successfully worked with HIV/AIDS patients and medical workers in Africa, the United States, and Europe. Following the atomic bombing of Japan, Dr. Tatsuchiro Akizuki, medical director of St. Francis’s Hospital in Nagasaki, saved the lives of his entire staff and patients with a strict macrobiotic diet while throughout the city thousands perished of radiation sickness. In Chelyabinsk, site of Soviet nuclear weapons production, and Chernobyl, site of the nuclear reactor explosion, Russian physicians used macrobiotic quality foods donated by the Kushi Institute, including brown rice and other whole grains, miso soup, sea vegetables, and special condiments such as umeboshi plums, to successfully treat people with leukemia, lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and other malignancies that resulted from exposure to nuclear radiation. 

Since the end of World War II, the planet has been beset with a series of grave crises, including the nuclear arms race, chronic and degenerative disease, and climate change. The macrobiotic approach has offered a healthy, peaceful way to resolve each of these challenges. The most recent crisis—the Ebola epidemic raging in West Africa—has now started to spread to the United States and Europe and threatens to become a global pandemic. At the present time, there is no effective medical treatment for Ebola, and no comprehensive dietary guidelines by WHO, CDC, governments, or other bodies.

We offer the following macrobiotic guidelines as a simple, practical, safe, and inexpensive way to treat people suffering from Ebola in Africa or at high risk for the disease in other parts of the world. Together with the medical profession, international relief agencies, and governments, we can join together and eventually stop Ebola from spreading, save many lives, and create a bright, healthy, peaceful future. 

  1. Origin and Cause of Ebola

The primary cause of Ebola is the modern way of farming and eating, especially chemical agriculture and a diet high in sugar, dairy food, heavy animal protein, and other highly processed foods. These create both an external and an internal environment in which the potentially deadly virus thrives.

Both the soil and the blood became too acidic as a result of major agriculture and food consumption patterns that took place following World War II. The macrobiotic approach is to balance this over acidity through natural and organic farming methods and by a balanced natural foods diet that alkalinizes the bloodstream, strengthens the lymph and other bodily fluids, and increases natural immunity to disease.

In the 1980s, I visited Central Africa and made a presentation on the macrobiotic approach to HIV/AIDS to 200 medical doctors, including many traditional folk healers, at a conference convened by the World Health Organization (WHO). I stayed two and a half weeks in the Republic of the Congo and near Brazzaville visited a village for one week and observed what ordinary people ate. The macrobiotic dietary approach helped many people in Africa, the United States, and around the world prevent, relieve, or control HIV/AIDs. As a viral disease originating in Central Africa, Ebola follows a pattern akin to AIDS, but it is much more virulent, acute, and deadly.

3. Dietary Guidelines for Ebola in Africa and Elsewhere during the recovery period, 1-2 weeks, average 10 days.

For Ebola patients or those at high risk for this disease, the following guidelines are suggested:

  • A. Basic food, including whole grains, miso soup, condiments, seasonings, and liquids.  These may be given daily for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

1. Whole grain, especially brown rice, is to be consumed as principle food daily.  It may be softly prepared, with porridge like consistency, especially if the person is weak and has trouble eating or digesting.  The grain should be eaten together with one of the following condiments: umeboshi plum (1/2 to 1 plum), gomashio (1/2 to 1 teaspoon), shiso leaf powder (1/2 to 1 teaspoon), or sea vegetable powder (1/2 to 1 teaspoon). 

2. Millet may be used instead of brown rice (if unavailable) or eaten in addition to brown rice.  Other whole grains may be substituted if rice or millet is not available, but these two grains are the strongest for healing.

3. Miso soup, 1-2 cups daily, using miso that is at least 6 to 12 months aged and ideally aged 2-years or more.  Barley miso is standard, though brown rice or all soybean (hatch) miso may also be used.  If none of these misos are available, other misos (such as red, yellow, or white) or instant miso soup may be taken.

4. If the person can eat solid food, a small volume of beans, vegetables, and sea vegetables may also be eaten in addition to the above, especially a one-pot or one-skillet meal made with a variety of vegetables, a strip of kombu or other seaweed or riverweed, and other plant-quality ingredients such as bean products (e.g. tofu or tempeh), roots, and tubers.

5. Kombu powder or other sea vegetable powder also may be used as a condiment.  Traditionally, Africans ate river moss and riverweed that gives strength and vitality. It was customarily dried, ground into a powder, and used as a condiment, garnish, or put in soups and other dishes.

6. Organic shoyu, or natural soy sauce, may be used in cooking as a seasoning for vegetable, bean, or sea vegetable dishes instead of sea salt.  All soybean products such as shoyu should be organic, as many soy and soy products are genetically modified.

7. Sea Salt should be used in cooking.  Rock salt is used in Africa, but there is acid in rock salt and it should be avoided or minimized.  Plain white sea salt is best.  Avoid grey, yellow, pink, and other sea salts that are high in minerals.

8. For a sweet taste, stewed apples or other cooked fruit may be taken.  For an even more concentrated sweet taste, use 1 to 2 tablespoons of rice syrup or barley malt.

9. Spring, well, or filtered water should be used for cooking or drinking.  To avoid dehydration, more liquid than usual may need to be taken.  Kukicha (also known as bancha twig tea) may be taken as a regular beverage. Roasted barley tea, other grain tea, or non-aromatic, non-stimulant tea may be taken occasionally.

  • B.  Foods to Avoid

1. Meals in Central and West Africa are often prepared in a single pot or skillet and eaten at the table.  They generally include vegetables, cassava, and other plant-quality ingredients, as well as frogs, fish, wild birds, or other animal food.  The animal products often originate in muddy or swampy environments that are extremely acidic.  All animal food should be strictly avoided temporarily until the crisis has passed.

2. Cassava (also know as tapioca and manioc) is a starchy root that was introduced to Africa several centuries ago from South America.  It was traditionally an emergency crop eaten in times of poor grain harvests or famine.  Today it has become the main staple in many parts of the region, even though rice, millet, sorghum, and other whole grains are available.  A small amount of cassava is fine for people in usual good health as a complement to whole grains, but should be avoided or reduced in the case of Ebola.

3. Sugar, white flour, milk and other dairy, canned foods, chemically grown foods, soft drinks, and other highly processed foods imported from abroad or donated by relief agencies should be avoided.

4. Oil should be temporarily avoided, as it can spread the virus.

5. All strong herbs and spices, especially peppers, curries, and other hot spices, should be avoided.  These stimulants can spread the virus.

  • C. Medicinal Drinks

The following medicinal drinks may be taken: 

1. Ume-Sho-Bancha (made with 1/2 to 1 umeboshi plum and several drops to 1 teaspoon of shoyu added to 1 cup of bancha twig tea) or Ume-Sho-Kuzu (made with umeboshi plum and shoyu and dissolved in 1 cup of water with a heaping teaspoon of kudzu root thickener). These are traditional preparations to strengthen the blood, overcome fatigue, and prevent infection.  Take 1 to 2 small cups of either drink every morning and evening for up to 10 days.

2. Other medicinal drinks and applications may also be used depending on the individual’s condition.

  • D. Recovery Period, average 2 weeks

After the virus has left the body, the patient should continue to eat very simply for two to four weeks, mostly whole grains, miso soup, vegetables, beans, sea vegetables, and condiments. Other foods may gradually be added, including: 

1.  A small volume of sesame oil may be used in cooking, especially sautéed vegetables.  If sesame is not available, other polyunsaturated or monosaturated oils such as corn or olive may be used.  Avoid, even when healthy, palm oil and coconut oil, which are saturated and raise cholesterol and increase the risk of heart disease.

2.  A small volume of herbs or spices may be gradually introduced.  But they should be mild and not too hot.

3.  A small volume of white-meat fish may be taken during the recovery period and served with lemon or grated radish to aid in digestion.  The fish may be steamed, boil, pouched, or cooked in the form of soup or stew with vegetables.

4.  After full recovery, the person should follow the standard macrobiotic dietary guidelines for usual good health (Click here for Standard Macrobiotic Guidelines). The following charts illustrate the average type and proportion of food (by weight, not volume) for Central and West Africa:

ebola chart 2 ebola chart 1

© 2014 by Michio Kushi and Midori H. Kushi. Copyright and image right protected. This article may be reprinted by nonprofit educational, medical, or humanitarian organizations. For information on commercial reproduction, please contact Kushi Institute, 198 Leland Road, Becket MA 01223. Tel 413-623-5741. Fax 413-623-8827.

Recommended Reading

  • AIDS, Macrobiotics, and Natural Immunity by Michio Kushi with Martha Cottrell, M.D., Japan Publications, 1990. Out of print but available used from Amazon.com.
  • Aveline Kushi’s Complete Guide to Macrobiotic Cooking by Aveline Kushi with Alex Jack, Warner Books, 1985. The principal macrobiotic cookbook.
    Purchase Book
  • The Book of Macrobiotics by Michio Kushi with Alex Jack, Square One Publications, 2013. Newly revised edition of the classic book on macrobiotic principles, including dietary guidelines for 10 regions of the world including Africa, summary of scientific-medical research on macrobiotics, and nutrient tables.
    Purchase Book
  • The Cancer Prevention Diet by Michio Kushi with Alex Jack, St Martin’s Press, 2010. The macrobiotic approach to 25 major types of cancer, including menus, recipes, and home cares.
    Purchase Book
  • Diet for a Strong Heart by Michio Kushi with Alex Jack, St. Martin’s Press, 1985. The macrobiotic approach to high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular conditions, including menus, recipes, and home cares.
  • Macrobiotic Home Remedies by Michio Kushi with Marc Van Cauwenberghe, M.D., Square One Publications, 2014. Newly revised edition of macrobiotic home cares, including special dishes, foods, and compresses that may be helpful for infectious conditions such as Ebola.
  • The Macrobiotic Path to Total Health by Michio Kushi with Alex Jack, Ballantine Books, 2003. A comprehensive guide to preventing and relieving more than 200 chronic and infectious conditions, including menus, recipes, and home cares.

 

Resources

Kushi Institutewww.kushiinstiute.org. The K.I. is the world center for macrobiotic learning and offers year-round residential programs to the general public on macrobiotic principles and practices, including cooking classes; teacher, counselor, and chef training; and the Way to Health Program, a 7-day residential program for preventing and relieving cancer, heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other chronic diseases. Personal macrobiotic dietary and way of life counseling, shiatsu massage, and other individual services are also available. Located on 600 acres in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts, K.I. is convenient to many artistic and cultural attractions. For more information, please contact: Kushi Institute, 198 Leland Road, Becket MA 01223. Tel 413-623-5741 or 800-975-8744. Fax 413-623-8827. Email: programs@kushiinstitute.org

Centers for Disease Control and Preventionwww.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/

The CDC is the U.S. government agency coordinating the response to Ebola and other public health issues and emergencies. It presents daily updates and the latest medical advice on the Ebola outbreak in Africa, America, and around the world.

 

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Pumpkin Pie (by Chris Jenkins)

Pumpkin Pie (by Chris Jenkins)

Pumpkin Pie – Just in Time for the Holidays – By Chef Chris Jenkins

Crust:
Dry Ingredients
1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1 cup unbleached all-purpose white flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
pinch of sea salt

Wet Ingredients
1/2 cup safflower oil
1/2 cup apple juice

Filling:
6 cups winter squash, like buttercup, peeled and cubed (or 3 cups pumpkin purée)
1/4 cup barley malt
1/4 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup rice syrup
2 tablespoons tahini
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
1 teaspoon agar powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
pinch of cloves
pinch of sea salt

To make the crust: Preheat oven to 350ºF (175ºC). Whisk together the dry ingredients and set aside. Mix the wet ingredients, and then mix the wet into the dry ingredients. Mix well to make a uniform dough. Let it rest for a few minutes. Sprinkle a little flour onto your work surface, and roll the dough flat with a rolling pin. Put the dough into an oiled pie pan. Poke holes into the bottom of the crust with a fork. You can decoratively shape the rim of the crust if you like. Bake the crust for ten minutes, and then set aside.

To make the filling: Steam or bake the squash until it is very soft. Purée all of the filling ingredients together in a blender or food processor. If the purée is too thick, you can add a 1/4 cup of rice milk.

When the crust is pre-baked and the filling is mixed, put the filling into the crust and level it with a spatula or spoon. Bake for 40 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown. Remove the pie from the oven, let it cool completely, and then slice and serve.

Makes one ten-inch pie

 

Check out more RECIPES by Chris Jenkins, a member of Kushi Institute Faculty, by visiting sixflavors.blogspot.com

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Tribute To Adelbert Nelissen

Tribute To Adelbert Nelissen

From Michio Kushi

Michio Kushi and Midori H. Kushi and Alex Jack with all the staff of the Kushi Institute in Becket extend our deepest sympathy and condolences and share the sadness with all of Adelbert Nelissen’s family and all the staff of the Kushi Institute in the Netherlands. We sincerely hope and pray that Adelbert’s dreams and activities over more than fifty years will be developed further by his family members and by other associates and colleagues.


From Alex Jack

Farewell, Dear Adelbert

You were one of the brightest stars in the macrobiotic firmament or sky. You were a pioneer of the natural foods movement, a leading macrobiotic teacher and counselor, and head of a devoted family. At times your manner and expression were very direct, but a warm heart always beat beneath your provocative exterior. You wanted nothing more than to awaken people to their deeper, higher selves. That was your mission and your joy.

Your brilliance shown in many practical and visionary accomplishments—from founding Manna and the East West Center, to launching the Kushi Institute of Europe and Deshima, to conceiving the Ideal Food Pattern and Macropedia—two projects I had the privilege of working on with you in recent years.

Like Daedalus, the architect, master craftsman, and inventor of the Labyrinth in Greek mythology, your most original contribution lay in art, creative expression, and design. Who can ever forget participating in one of your walking tours among the canals, bridges, and historic buildings and sites of Amsterdam in which you wove a vibrant tapestry of yin/yang polarities, spiral ratios, and the convergence of all five stages of transformation in one sublime vista? And like Icarus, Daedalus’s son and dearest creation, you dared to fly too close to the sun.

In 2001, just thirteen years ago this week, you and I set out on a memorable 10-day journey through southern France and northern Italy, visiting rice fields and warning farmers of the dangers of GMO rice. We rented a small car and took a winding course along the Mediterranean Sea. Periodically, you would stop the vehicle, strip off your clothes, and dive into the glistening deep. I would hold my breath, fearful that you would crash on a big rock, but you always emerged unscathed and refreshed.

Whether leading the campaign against the Modern Food Pattern—the Minotaur at the center of the labyrinth of personal and social decline in our time—scaling an Alpine or Himalayan peak, combatting the ignorance and folly of the contemporary medical system, or cycling with your family, you pushed yourself to the limit.

And like Icarus, Daedalus’s son, the warm, caressing rays of the sun ultimately melted your wings, and you fell back to earth. You died as you lived, pursuing your eternal dream.

Dear Adelbert, now your strong, resourceful mind and loving heart are at rest. May your bright, shining spirit travel freely in the world of light. May you be surrounded by love and peace and be uplifted by the prayers and thoughts of all those you left behind. May we be forever one.

Fare thee well, dear Adelbert.

Adelbert Pic Cooking

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I lost 70 lbs in 70 days on a macrobiotic diet

I lost 70 lbs in 70 days on a macrobiotic diet

I lost 70 lbs in 70 days on a macrobiotic diet!

Written By Marisa Marinelli

Andre was born and raise in Brazil.  At the age of 25, he considered himself a happy young adult who liked to have fun with his friends. After being diagnosed with necrosis of the bone in his femur, he was inspired to try a macrobiotic lifestyle to see if it would help. Not only did he heal his bone, he lost 70 lbs in 70 days! Read his dramatic weight loss interview below:

 andre_before_2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What was your lifestyle like before you lost the weight?

I used to go out with my friends 3 or 4 times a week to bars where we would drink or eat out at restaurants. We’d stay out really late into evening and it happened a lot. Usually when we go out we would end up eating the food at the bar, a lot of fried things such as pork. A lot of pork is served in Brazil where I lived. Eating and drinking late at night was for sure.

Would you say you were happy with your life during that time?

Yes. Yes I was. Definitely happy.

When did you discover macrobiotics?

The first time I had contact with macrobiotics was in 2004 through a friend. He was giving it a try for a while. In one month (of eating this way) I saw a difference in him. His face looked like he was 2 years younger and he had lost some weight. When I first decided to try macrobiotics it was in 2009. I had a problem with my bone structure. I had necrosis of the bone which means it started to die due to a lack of oxygen. The doctors wanted to cut the femur and put in a metal piece. I did not want to have this procedure done at all. I thought it would be absurd if this was the only option they were offering me. I went to a few doctors to get second opinions but they all said I needed this surgery. The condition was so bad that I walked around with a cane at the age of 25.  At this time, I recalled my friend’s experience with macrobiotics and decided to do it for myself. I found a counselor (where I lived) in Brazil and started to work with him.

What changes did you see after adopting macrobiotics into your life?

After that I started to feel very very very well. My happiness increased! I thought I was already happy but I feel so much happier now after macrobiotics.

I lost 70 lbs in 70 days. Since then I have maintained this weight for the last 5 years because I continued to practice macrobiotics.  AND my bone healed! [Andre says this as he jumps up and down on one leg]. I did not have any surgery and have not been back to the doctors since. I feel great!

What was the hardest challenge that you had in changing your lifestyle?

Avoiding cravings for old food was my biggest challenge. I was very lucky to have the support of my family and girlfriend at the time. They were very supportive and that helped me a lot to continue what I was doing. I used to eat a lot of pizza and hamburgers before [my diet change] so there were a lot of cravings [for those heavy foods]. The alcohol was never a problem to let go. My friends were okay with me not drinking. I still when out to the bars with them and I would take my kukicha tea with me. When I went out to dinner with my girlfriend I would explain to the restaurant manager that I could not eat this food and they would not have a problem with me bringing my own food. Of course, this was in Brazil.

Do you eat out at restaurants now?

Not yet, not in 5 years. I cook for myself every day.  Living here at the K.I. is the first time I’m not cooking for myself, however I know I’m being supported with good healthy food.

What brings you to Kushi Institute in Becket, MA?

I realized that I want to work with macrobiotics. I want it to be the main part of my life. When I discovered this opportunity to study and this was the best place to learn this material, I didn’t even think twice about it. I quit my job and came here to do the [Macrobiotic Leadership Training] Levels. I’m not sure exactly how yet, but I know this is my path.

 

For more information on Kushi Institute’s macrobiotic approach to weight loss, register today for our Healthy Weight Loss Program.

Upcoming dates posted throughout the year!

 

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Where Are They Now? Kushi Institute Level 3 Graduate Andrea Beaudoin

Where Are They Now? Kushi Institute Level 3 Graduate Andrea Beaudoin

1d1d96cJust over a year ago, KI Level 3 Graduate
Andrea Beaudoin opened her food truck Hearty Eats. This spring, she added a permanent restaurant in Shelburne Falls, Mass. Now, she’s heading back to Kushi for the first ever Local Berkshire Food Fair on Sunday, August 10. We caught up with her to talk about then and now as well as her continuing vision for the future.

 

 

How did you discover Macrobiotics?
I was working in Boston when I started having health issues. I was diagnosed with a rare, aggressive form of HPV, so I was trying to understand my health better. A friend introduced me to macrobiotics, and I launched into my own process of discovery through books. I changed my diet and ate really narrowly for a little while so my body could start detoxing and healing. I also quit smoking. Eight months later, I conceded to having a cold knife cone biopsy, which looks for deeper cancerous development, but there was no evidence of cancer or even a sign that there had ever been a problem. So, I really believed in what I was doing.

 

 

When did you decide to start the Level Program at KI?
Basically, I decided that if I was going to live this way, I needed to understand it on a deeper level. I took the first week of Level 1 to get a taste of it while I was still working in the corporate world back in Boston. In January 2013, I left my job and completed the program through Level 3. I was getting an in-depth understanding plus time for healing and changing the direction my life was heading. I didn’t come from the food industry, but I knew I would use what I learned from Kushi for the rest of my life, whether I made a career out of it or not.

 

 

Why a food truck?Truck_Border
Even before I left my job, I was racking my brain: “What am I going to do? What am I going to do?” I spent a lot of time reflecting on who I am, what’s important to me, what the world could benefit from and how to succeed in doing what you love while paying bills – because there’s a balance there. I had always wanted accessible healthy food while I was working in the city. So I ended up buying a food truck with no solid plan.

 

 

Can you let us in on the name “Hearty Eats”?
Hearty Eats is a joke. The name came while laughing over the health food/fast food/drive thru concept with friends. We imagined the golden arches bending further, turning into a green heart. So “Hearty Eats” comes from that ongoing joke. Also, the food is hearty. A lot of people think health food is salads. I think what’s really key about Macrobiotics is the food is hearty. It’s not leaving you hungry. It’s healing, nourishing food. Heart health is another. I just couldn’t get away from the name because of all of the meaning in it.

 

 

What was the initial response to a Macro-friendly food truck?
We put clean, digestible, balanced food out into the world without a label. Macrobiotic, vegan, gluten-free – our food is all these things yet it’s presented in a format regular people relate to. We soak our rice and use kombu. We pick high-quality fresh ingredients. Everything is from scratch. People know it when they taste it and they comment all of the time that it’s the “best” or the “cleanest” or the “healthiest” food without us telling them. So we don’t scream “Gluten-free!” We don’t scream “Vegan!” We don’t scream “Macrobiotic!” Instead, we’re saying, “Why can’t this just be the norm?” At our first event it was just us and three BBQ trucks, and we had a line all day.

 

 

Other than the upcoming Local Berkshire Food Fair at Kushi Institute on August 10th, where can people generally find Hearty Eats?
As for the truck, we’ve been doing music festivals, the Brimfield Antique Show, Wanderlust VT, etc. Increasingly, we’re sticking to local events in our area, especially daytime events centering around lunch. We just opened a restaurant in Shelburne Falls, Mass. at 24 Bridge Street.

 

Restaurant_Border

 What’s next for Hearty Eats?
There’s nothing static about our vision. Our plan is to evolve as things make sense. We hadn’t planned on a restaurant just a year after the truck. It came together with the good response to our food and the timing of the Shelburne Falls space. We’d like multiple locations. Long term, we’d like drive thrus. Healthy fast food is not the solution to the world’s problems, but it’s a place to start. If you’re too idealistic, you can’t reach the people. We’d also like to add fish to the menu and get through the winter on exclusively New England produce.

 

 
What’s next for you?
Farming is a huge passion of mine. I am extremely energized by time spent in nature and in the garden. My partner, Colin Bargeron, and I live on seven acres, and we’ve been growing rice. We have two little paddies now, planted from the rice we grew last year with the help of Christian Elwell at South River Miso. As time goes on, we’d like to start supplying produce for Hearty Eats. When it comes to all of these personal and professional pursuits, Colin and I have accomplished them together. Before we really got going with the restaurant setup this spring, we took the winter to man a sailboat from Los Angeles to Guatemala.

 

 

Looking back, what has guided you through this time of expansion?
My greatest inspiration from macrobiotics is that everything is always seeking balance. The middle is a constantly moving point, so being awake and open and clear enough to realize where that point is and maintain it is an everyday undertaking. It’s my intention with each dish.

 

 

Find Hearty Eats at Facebook.com/HeartyEats

 

 

 

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Rx for Retirement: Marty Pardoll

Rx for Retirement: Marty Pardoll

My story begins long before thoughts of retirement. When I was nineteen, I had my gall bladder and appendix removed, and that is when all the trouble started. My doctors said I could continue to eat normally and that it would be alright to eat fats and oils as before. They recommended no change in my diet. Without direction, and since I had many weight issues (fluctuating 20-25 lbs.), I tried a lot of diets over the years, including a diet of only meat and cheese.

I grew up in the United States but have now called France home for over 30 years. When I saw a homeopathic doctor there, he said that I should have been more careful and steered away from fats and oils because they were taxing my liver. I then proceeded to get off meat. I was trying to be careful about oils, but I still did not know how to balance my diet.

Around the year 2000 I was experiencing chronic fatigue. I had no energy, I was urinating frequently, and I was depressed because I was not working. I stopped smoking but still could not understand the cause of my problems. I had some blood tests because I thought I was anemic, but the results did not show any abnormalities. Also, I had a history of being depressed. I became desperate.

I saw a poster for a macrobiotic cooking class and decided to go. After the cooking class I immediately had a macrobiotic consultation. The macrobiotic counselor told me that I could feel better in a month, so I followed exactly what she told me to do. In ten days I had so much energy that I practically flew out of bed in the mornings.

My whole person improved. Before starting the macrobiotic diet I was so confused about what I wanted to do with my life. After one month on the macrobiotic diet, my thinking was so clear I decided to open an organic catering company. At this point I had the energy to do it. This I attributed to being on the macrobiotic diet. I was able to make a good living with my catering company.

After a couple of years of being on the macrobiotic diet I started to sway. Then I developed osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and weak kidneys, and I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic. I was on my feet all the time with work, sometimes working 14-16 hours. I had a small business and was doing everything myself. This caused an osteoarthritis attack in my feet, and I had trouble walking for 3 months.

I decided to retire earlier instead of waiting until I was 67. I retired and went back on a strict macrobiotic diet. I got my health back plus ten times more energy again.

Since returning to the macrobiotic diet, I have never had a depressive episode. Even when I had major family problems, I was able to deal with them head on. I now walk for hours most days, and I can manage all my conditions without any medications.

The feeling of joy and vitality I now have I attribute to the macrobiotic diet and lifestyle.

Macrobiotics has done so much to change my life that I grew a desire to go to the Kushi Institute and study more so that I could help others. I am retired now and still have plenty of energy so I traveled all the way from France to the Kushi Institute in the Becket, MA. I completed Level 1 at the Kushi Institute in Europe ten years ago, and ever since that time, I have wanted to continue with Levels 2 and 3 as well as the first week of Level 4 to gain an advanced understanding useful for counseling others.

I mentioned I am pursuing this in my retirement and so I would like to speak a little bit about retirement itself. Getting old does not have to mean getting sick. Getting old is not something to fear if you have vitality and your health. People are in fear all day about getting old because they think their future is drugs, doctor’s visits and nursing homes. Through the macrobiotic way, I alone determine my health through proper eating habits and lifestyle choices. Retirement is greater if I have my health and I can determine the quality of my life. I choose, it is my choice!

At the time of publication, Marty is half way through the first week of Level 4 at the Kushi Institute.

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Series: Doctors Discover Nutrition: Meet Sommer White, MD

Series: Doctors Discover Nutrition:  Meet Sommer White, MD

Meet Sommer White, MD, Emergency Medicine from California

 

Since I was a child, I wanted to become a physician so that I could help others. I specifically chose Emergency Medicine because I felt like it was a place where I could immediately help people and feel like I was making an significant difference in their lives. The ability to relieve someone’s acute physical pain and make them feel comfortable is one of the most rewarding aspects of my job.

 

I wanted to learn the macrobiotic diet because I was looking for a cure for my illnesses, a way to feel better without taking medications that would merely mask the symptoms. I had been chronically fatigued for years and had dark circles around my eyes. I suffered from frequent urination and could never sleep through the night because I would get up to urinate 3-4 times. I was also irritable, anxious and would frequently break out in cold sores. Working in the emergency department, I kept odd hours, and would sometimes stay awake for long periods. Even when I wasn’t working the night shift, I would stay up late and sleep late the following morning. I felt like I couldn’t get enough sleep.

 

Macrobiotics has been a part of my life since I was a child. My mother practiced macrobiotics on and off for years, and used it to overcome breast cancer when she was 48 years old. She had always talked about studying at the Kushi Institute and encouraged me to do so as well.

 

I have been practicing macrobiotics for about a year and a half. Overall, my fatigue has greatly diminished. I no longer need caffeine to wake up in the morning, and my nighttime urination has improved. My body feels strong and healthy, and my mind is calmer. I am adjusting my lifestyle to be physically and emotionally healthier. I try to go to sleep and get up earlier, which makes my days feel much longer and more fulfilling. I now wake up rested.

 

Practicing macrobiotics has given me focus, clarity, fulfillment, and direction for my new path as a holistic practitioner. It has given me joy in the kitchen and connection to the food I am preparing. I always wanted to be able to make myself a nice lunch, and now I have the skills to do that! I love being able to go the refrigerator, take out fresh ingredients and make a meal that is delicious, satisfying and healthy. Macrobiotics has taught me to care for myself on all levels–physically, emotionally, and spiritually. My studies at the Kushi Institute have taken my practice to a deeper level, and they are teaching me what it truly means to be a holistic practitioner. I’m starting to understand the human body and mind differently and really believe that we can cure our illnesses with diet and lifestyle. The medical system as we know it today is broken. The complexities that surround the attitudes of doctors and patients combined with our fast-paced lifestyles have caused us to look for quick fixes instead of slowing down and really focusing on the root causes of the problems. We fail to see how our diets, lifestyles and emotions impact our health, and more importantly how changing them can cure our illnesses.

 

“Macrobiotics has shown me how to take my health into my own hands and to facilitate healing. I can only hope that it does this for many others, for this is the power of the practice, and the answer to our broken system.”

 

  sommer white4

 

After eating macrobiotic food for a short time, I began to feel my body and mind changing. I knew I wanted to learn more about what was happening. I made a decision to enroll in the Kushi Institute’s Macrobiotic Leadership Program, Level 1. During the first two weeks of Level 1, I started to grasp the basic concepts of yin and yang and understand how food affects our bodies. By the end of Level 1, I felt a stronger understanding of the basic concepts, and started to understand why people refer to it as a spiritual diet. I felt such an appreciation for what I was learning and what I was eating. My studies at the Kushi Institute are invaluable and exciting, and I look forward to beginning Level 2 in the fall. My goal is to finish all four levels.

 

 

 

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Eat, Play, Yoga – Meet Masumi Goldman

Eat, Play, Yoga – Meet Masumi Goldman

Masumi began healing from the symptoms of a painful autoimmune illness after attending Kushi Institute’s February 2012 Way to Health program. After eating and living in accordance with macrobiotic principals and philosophy for over two years, her life has changed dramatically. Masumi lives without medications, has minimized the occurrence of painful flare-ups, and is now allergy free—an unexpected bonus of adopting a macrobiotic lifestyle. Over the course of the past year, she has also become certified to teach yoga, launched a website with a friend and business partner www.twofitmoms.com, has an impressive following on her Instagram site of over 99,000, and was featured in the June 2014 Yoga Journal magazine. We are honored to have Masumi join Kushi Institute’s 2014 Summer Conference Festival faculty.

“I was very fortunate to be born and raised in a macrobiotic home for the first 18 years of my life. I had a really healthy childhood. I was rarely sick, and never took any medications.

 When I left for college, my eating habits began to change. Although I still ate plenty of fruits and vegetables, I started eating a standard American diet including processed foods and dairy (pizza, bagels, cereal, yogurt, etc.) It was also in my early 20’s that I developed incapacitating seasonal allergies. I did not make the connection at the time, but in retrospect, it is crystal clear that these allergies were associated with the dietary and lifestyle changes that commenced with my leaving the nest.

Masumi Before and AfterIn the fall of 2011, I began having terrible pain in my hips and feet. Exercising (jogging in particular) was a big part of my life, so I assumed the pain was from running on a daily basis. Even walking became a painful activity! The aching in my heels was intense, and the burning sensation in my hip joints was so severe that I couldn’t fall asleep at night. I stopped running, sold my treadmill, and sought the opinion of a medical professional.  After receiving orthotic inserts for my shoes and spending weeks in physical therapy with no improvement, my doctor ordered blood tests. I always thought of myself as a very healthy individual, so I was very surprised to learn that the blood work showed abnormalities.

Some of my results were consistent with rheumatoid arthritis, but because my disease featured very acute flare ups (versus gradual onset) that were not isolated to my joints, I was not diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. My doctor told me that I had my very own variation of an autoimmune disease that affects joints AND ligaments. I was then told that the drugs that are traditionally used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and similar illnesses were harsh and could have side effects that were worse than the disease symptoms themselves!

Rather than taking drugs, I told my doctor that I knew of something else that could potentially help. I immediately enrolled in the Kushi Institute’s Way to Health program in February 2012. I decided that it was time to return to my macrobiotic roots. I even scheduled a private consultation with a macrobiotic counselor, Bettina Zumdick. Bettina assured me that if I followed all of her suggestions for diet and lifestyle changes, my pain would disappear. She also explained that in the process, as a side effect, my seasonal allergies would be gone by next Spring. Although I turned to macrobiotics to solely tend to my autoimmune illness, I was relieved and excited to learn that my new healing diet could help me with hay fever symptoms. My seasonal allergies had become so severe that I dreaded being outdoors between April and June. Even with allergy medication, my symptoms could not be controlled. I avoided being outside, I lived with my windows shut, and I showered often to remove pollen from my hair and skin. ”

“Since my return to macrobiotics in February 2012, I have been able to manage my autoimmune illness with food and lifestyle, rather than drugs, and the seasonal allergies that plagued me from 1996-2013 are gone!”

 Masumi tries to spread knowledge of general wellness – fitness, yoga, macrobiotic healthy living/eating – by sharing her lifestyle on social media platforms to empower others to take charge of their own health and well-being.

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